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581: Unraveling the Mechanisms Behind Memory in the Human Brain – Dr. Rodrigo Quian Quiroga

Podcast: People Behind the Science Podcast – Stories from Scientists about Science, Life, Research, and Science Careers (LS 51 · TOP 0.5% what is this?)
Episode: 581: Unraveling the Mechanisms Behind Memory in the Human Brain – Dr. Rodrigo Quian Quiroga
Pub date: 2020-11-30

Dr. Rodrigo Quian Quiroga is a Professor and Director of the Centre for Systems Neuroscience at the University of Leicester in the United Kingdom. He is also an author of the books Borges and Memory, Principles of Neural Coding, Imaging Brain Function with EEG, and The Forgetting Machine. Rodrigo is interested in understanding how memory works and how the brain works in general. He conducts experiments to determine how the neurons in our brain make us see, feel, make decisions, and remember the things we experience and learn in our lives. The memory research in Rodrigo’s lab investigates how memories are formed, stored, consolidated, and forgotten. Rodrigo also enjoys getting out of the lab to give his mind a break from thinking about experiments. In particular, he enjoys hanging out with his wife and kids, playing sports, and practicing Judo. Rodrigo received his undergraduate training in physics from the University of Buenos Aires in Argentina and was awarded his PhD in Applied Mathematics from the University of Luebeck in Germany. He was a postdoctoral fellow at the Research Center Juelich in Germany and he received a Sloan Fellowship to conduct research at the California Institute of Technology. Rodrigo also worked briefly at RIKEN in Japan and at the University of Nijmegen in The Netherlands. Rodrigo has received numerous awards and honors including the Royal Society Wolfson Research Merit Award, a Young Investigator Award from the American Epilepsy Society, and Rodrigo was also named one of 10 UK RISE Leaders in Science and Engineering in 2014. Rodrigo spoke with us about his experiences his career, research, and life.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Dr. Marie McNeely, featuring top scientists speaking about their life and c, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Stories of COVID-19: Adaptation, Part 1

Podcast: The Story Collider (LS 58 · TOP 0.5% what is this?)
Episode: Stories of COVID-19: Adaptation, Part 1
Pub date: 2020-11-27

The pandemic has forced us all to adapt in various ways, for the sake of our physical or mental health. The stories in this week’s episode will focus on the ways in which our storytellers have forged new lives and routines for themselves.

Our first story is from Fiona Calvert, Story Collider UK producer and science communication officer at Alzheimer’s Research UK. Fiona has worked hard to manage her obsessive compulsive disorder, but when the pandemic begins, suddenly triggers are everywhere.

After Fiona’s story, our host interviews psychologist Dr. Kevin Chapman about how we can adapt to protect our mental health during this time.

Stay tuned for two more stories on Monday, from bestselling author Matthew Dicks and veterinarian Lauren Adelman! And see our website for transcripts and photos for all of our stories!

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Erin Barker, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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114: Diversity in science (with Jess Wade)

Podcast: Everything Hertz (LS 42 · TOP 1.5% what is this?)
Episode: 114: Diversity in science (with Jess Wade)
Pub date: 2020-08-17

We chat with Jess Wade (Imperial College London) about diversity issues in science, including her work increasing the profile of underrepresented scientists on Wikipedia and on getting more young women into science.

Here’s what we cover:

  • Jess’ Wikipedia page
  • Inferior, by Angela Saini
  • What’s involved when making a bio page?
  • The “notability” criteria for adding a scientist’s bio on wikipedia
  • Listen to Wikipedia grow on Hatnote
  • Don’t write your own page, even under a psuedonym.
  • What’s the best way to get girls into science and engineering?
  • The lack of diversity in science award winners
  • Follow Jess on Twitter!
  • The opportunuties provided by social media
  • Using social media to scope out new labs

Other links

Music credits: [Lee Rosevere](freemusicarchive.org/music/Lee_Rosevere/)


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  • $1 a month: 20% discount on Everything Hertz merchandise, a monthly newsletter, access to the occasional bonus episode, and the the warm feeling you’re supporting the show

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Episode citation
Quintana, D.S., Heathers, J.A.J. (Hosts). (2020, August 16) “114: Diversity in Science (with Jess Wade)”, Everything Hertz [Audio podcast], DOI: 10.17605/OSF.IO/A6VMU

Special Guest: Jess Wade.

Support Everything Hertz

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Dan Quintana, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

Audio

Femke Vossepoel | Applying Data Assimilation Tools to COVID Forecasting Models

Podcast: Women in Data Science (LS 39 · TOP 2.5% what is this?)
Episode: Femke Vossepoel | Applying Data Assimilation Tools to COVID Forecasting Models
Pub date: 2020-10-27

After earning her PhD in Aerospace Engineering at Delft, Femke spent several years in oceanography, climate research, and subsurface modeling. She developed an expertise in data assimilation that she’s now applying to improve COVID-19 pandemic forecasting models. 

Femke explains that data assimilation originated in weather forecasting, where a model is updated with the current day’s weather observations to provide a more accurate forecast for the next day. Data assimilation tools tune the model to provide a more accurate forecast. This concept can be applied in many areas including financial markets, the oil industry, and for COVID-19 research.

To help improve COVID-19 forecasting, she is using a compartmental model where there are compartments for different groups: those susceptible to COVID-19, those exposed to it, those infected, those who recovered, those in quarantine, and those who are deceased. The model is like a set of boxes, and the transition from one box to the other is governed by an ordinary differential equation. Then in those equations, you have parameters, which are typically not well-known. 

The data assimilation approach is to work more from the “outside in” instead of from the “inside out”. So, if you know the number of people that have died since the start of COVID, then according to this data, you can determine what the parameters would have looked like three weeks ago. With this type of inverse modeling, you can actually tune the parameters in that compartment model, and find the most likely reproduction number or the likely number of infected in the first place. The approach of having these simple relationships between the different compartments is a good framework for a very complex process. However, you cannot expect the data to tell you the story if you don’t have any prior domain knowledge. In order to take their research to the next level, it will be critical for Femke and her colleagues to collaborate with the medical experts that built the models who know how to express certain relationships.

As she has transitioned from one field to another in her career, Femke has needed to learn how to apply her expertise to entirely different research areas. She says one of the most important skills she has developed is to ask a lot of questions and not worry about being wrong and she advises young researchers to do the same. Sometimes those questions can help people already in the field think differently, and lead to new insights. 

Femke’s experience as an endurance athlete has also taught her valuable lessons for her work as a scientist. “People who excel in sports lose more races than they win. You have to make mistakes and fail, that’s the way you actually grow.” It also teaches you perseverance, to hang in there when it gets tough, and be happy with small increments of your own progress rather than always comparing yourself to your competitors.

RELATED LINKS

Connect with Femke Vossepoel on LinkedIn
Find out more about Femke on her TU Delft profile
Read more about TU Delft Civil Engineering and Geosciences
Connect with Margot Gerritsen on Twitter (@margootjeg) and LinkedIn
Find out more about Margot on her Stanford Profile

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Professor Margot Gerritsen, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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159: Connecting Students in a Disconnected World

Podcast: The Cult of Pedagogy Podcast (LS 65 · TOP 0.1% what is this?)
Episode: 159: Connecting Students in a Disconnected World
Pub date: 2020-11-23

Breakout rooms, collaborative projects, games—whatever we do, it’s crucial that we do something to get our students talking to each other. In this episode, I’m giving you a huge list of ideas teachers have shared with me for getting students to interact better, both in-person and remotely.

This episode is sponsored by Listenwise and National Geographic Education.

Check out my new mini-course, Four Laws of Learning, and use the code LISTENER at checkout to take $5 off course tuition.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Jennifer Gonzalez, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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How to bounce back from a bruising peer-review or paper rejection

Podcast: Working Scientist (LS 29 · TOP 10% what is this?)
Episode: How to bounce back from a bruising peer-review or paper rejection
Pub date: 2020-02-21

It’s important not to take reviewers’ comments personally, even if you feel they have misunderstood the science, Adam Levy discovers.

 


See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Nature Careers, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

Audio

Joe Public, Will You Marry Me?

Podcast: The Black Goat (LS 42 · TOP 1.5% what is this?)
Episode: Joe Public, Will You Marry Me?
Pub date: 2020-04-01

In recent years there has been a lot of talk about public trust in science – how much there is, in what ways, whether we deserve it or not. In this episode, we discuss an article by historian and philosopher Rachel Ankeny that asks whether “trust” is even the right concept to be talking about. What does it mean to trust an abstraction like “science”? When people argue about trust in science, are they even talking about the same thing – the findings, the people, the process, or something else? And we discuss Ankeny’s proposed alternative: that instead of the public’s trust, scientists should be seeking out engagement. What would an engagement model looks like? How would engagement benefit the public? How would it benefit science? And what about people who just wouldn’t want to engage? Plus: We answer a letter from someone who likes, but doesn’t love, teaching, and wants to know if that’s good enough for academia.

Links:

The Black Goat is hosted by Sanjay Srivastava, Alexa Tullett, and Simine Vazire. Find us on the web at www.theblackgoatpodcast.com, on Twitter at @blackgoatpod, on Facebook at facebook.com/blackgoatpod/, and on instagram at @blackgoatpod. You can email us at letters@theblackgoatpodcast.com. You can subscribe to us on iTunes or Stitcher.

Our theme music is Peak Beak by Doctor Turtle, available on freemusicarchive.org under a Creative Commons noncommercial attribution license. Our logo was created by Jude Weaver.

This is episode 77. It was recorded on March 26, 2020.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Sanjay Srivastava, Alexa Tullett, and Simine Vazire, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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156: Subversion: An Essential Tool of the Master Teacher

Podcast: The Cult of Pedagogy Podcast (LS 65 · TOP 0.1% what is this?)
Episode: 156: Subversion: An Essential Tool of the Master Teacher
Pub date: 2020-10-12

Sometimes, to do right by their students, good teachers have to break the rules. In this episode, I talk with Melinda Anderson, author of Becoming a Teacher, about the times when doing the right thing means bucking the system.

Get the book, Becoming a Teacher (Amazon Affiliate link)

Follow Melinda Anderson on Twitter: @mdawriter

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Jennifer Gonzalez, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.