Audio

Early Galaxies’ Formation – Arianna Long

Podcast: Parsing Science: The unpublished stories behind the world’s most compelling science, as told by the researchers themselves. (LS 28 · TOP 10% what is this?)
Episode: Early Galaxies’ Formation – Arianna Long
Pub date: 2020-11-23


How did the earliest and largest clusters of galaxies form? In episode 88, Arianna Long from the University California – Irvine discusses her research into the emergence of massive dusty star-forming galaxies which developed billions of years ago.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Parsing Science: The unpublished stories behind the world’s most compelling science, as told by the researchers themselves., which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

Audio

Stories of COVID-19: Teachers

Podcast: The Story Collider (LS 58 · TOP 0.5% what is this?)
Episode: Stories of COVID-19: Teachers
Pub date: 2021-04-16

Few professions outside of medicine and research have played as pivotal of a role in the events of the past year as teachers have. In today’s episode, we’ll hear two stories — one from a Chicago Public Schools teacher and another from a New York Public Schools teacher — about how the challenges and triumphs they’ve experienced during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Part 1: Jenny DeLessio-Parson has always prided herself on being a super teacher — until the challenges of remote teaching during the COVID-19 pandemic begin to add up.

Part 2: As the COVID-19 pandemic progresses, Amanda Geduld begins to feel that she and her fellow teachers aren’t receiving the support and respect they need to do their jobs.

Jenny DeLessio-Parson was born and raised in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. After studying Public Policy in college, she worked in various roles serving Chicago students and families before returning to school to become a teacher. Jenny has been an educator with Chicago Public Schools for 8 years and currently serves as a middle school Social Studies teacher and staff delegate to the Chicago Teachers Union. She was introduced to storytelling through Lily Be, which later led her to become co-host of The Stoop, a Chicago-based storytelling show.

Amanda Geduld received her B.A. from Dartmouth College in English Literature and Women’s and Gender Studies. She went on to study English education at Boston University where she received her M.Ed. Now serving as an 11th and 12th grade ELA teacher in the Bronx, she is deeply passionate about approaching education reform through a social justice lens. Her writing has been featured in The Washington Post and CNN.

As always, find photos and transcripts at storycollider.org

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The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Erin Barker, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

Audio

Melanie Mitchell Takes AI Research Back to Its Roots

Podcast: The Joy of x (LS 48 · TOP 1% what is this?)
Episode: Melanie Mitchell Takes AI Research Back to Its Roots
Pub date: 2021-04-19

To build a general artificial intelligence, we may need to know more about our own minds, argues the computer scientist Melanie Mitchell.

The post Melanie Mitchell Takes AI Research Back to Its Roots first appeared on Quanta Magazine.

The post Melanie Mitchell Takes AI Research Back to Its Roots first appeared on Quanta Magazine

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Steven Strogatz and Quanta Magazine, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

Audio

Working Scientist podcast: How to inspire young women to consider scientific careerssode

Podcast: Working Scientist (LS 30 · TOP 10% what is this?)
Episode: Working Scientist podcast: How to inspire young women to consider scientific careerssode
Pub date: 2019-10-15

Two projects aimed at boosting female representation in STEM have won the second Nature Research Awards for Inspiring Science and Innovating Science, in partnership with The Estée Lauder Companies.

Jean Fan spent a year volunteering at a science club for high school students during her PhD programme at Harvard University and was struck by how many of them dismissed the idea of becoming scientists themselves.

“A lot of my students would make remarks like ‘I’m not quite a maths person,’ or would not see themselves as future scientists,” she tells Julie Gould.

“I really wanted to leave them with some type of gift to encourage them to continue developing their interest in science.”

As a result Fan, who was the sole female graduate student in her PhD bioinformatics programme, launched cuSTEMized, a non-profit that uses personalised educational storybooks (which she writes and illustrates) to inspire girls about scientific careers.

This week, at a ceremony in London, she won the 2019 Inspiring Science Award, one of two offered by Nature Research and the Estée Lauder Companies.

The second award, Innovation in Science, goes to Doreen Anene, a PhD student at the University of Nottingham, UK.

In 2017 Anene launched The STEM Belle, a non-profile based in Nigeria, her home country. The STEM Belle also works in Ghana and Pakistan.

As its website says, The STEM Belle is “focused on levelling up the female representation in Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics fields by attracting, retaining and advancing more girls and young women to STEM subjects and fields.”

 


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The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Nature Careers, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

Audio

596: Studying the Science of Sound and How Building Acoustics Affect Performance – Dr. Lily Wang

Podcast: People Behind the Science Podcast – Stories from Scientists about Science, Life, Research, and Science Careers (LS 51 · TOP 1% what is this?)
Episode: 596: Studying the Science of Sound and How Building Acoustics Affect Performance – Dr. Lily Wang
Pub date: 2021-03-15

Dr. Lily Wang is a Professor of Architectural Engineering in the Durham School of Architectural Engineering and Construction and the Associate Dean for Graduate Programs and Faculty Development in the College of Engineering at the University of Nebraska, Lincoln. Lily’s research is in the field of architectural acoustics, which helps us understand how sound behaves in buildings, from glamorous concert halls to everyday offices and classrooms. When she’s not in the lab, Lily loves to sing and spend some quality time playing with her two young daughters. She received her PhD in Acoustics from Pennsylvania State University. She then worked as a research fellow in the Department of Acoustic Technology at the Technical University of Denmark before accepting a faculty position at UNL. Lily has received many awards and honors during her career, including the R. Bruce Lindsay Award, the top award given by the Acoustical Society of America to a person under 35 years of age. Lily has also been awarded a National Science Foundation CAREER Award as well as numerous awards from the University of Nebraska, Lincoln for teaching and mentorship.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Dr. Marie McNeely, featuring top scientists speaking about their life and c, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

Audio

Ep08 – Edge AI and Embedded Machine Learning w/ Erik Edmonds

Podcast: The Weekly Regression
Episode: Ep08 – Edge AI and Embedded Machine Learning w/ Erik Edmonds
Pub date: 2021-03-31

In this episode, we are joined by Erik Edmonds, a Computer Vision Engineer at Caterpillar Inc.

  Erik talks about how he embeds AI models into hardware that is used to power autonomous vehicles used in mining operations based in Australia. We have a great discussion about how CV Engineers differ from traditional Machine Learning  Engineers, and we talk about the various constraints that need to be addressed when developing AI on the Edge.  Additionally, we go over examples at Apple and Google where embedded AI is used to run commonly used applications and frameworks.

  Check out other projects by Erik HERE [https://erik-edmonds.github.io/]

  Follow the TWR Podcast on:
  Instagram HERE [https://www.instagram.com/theweeklyregression/]
  Twitter HERE [https://twitter.com/TheWeeklyReg]
  LinkedIn HERE [https://www.linkedin.com/company/the-weekly-regres]

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Rayhaan Rasheed, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

Audio

123: Authenticated anonymity (with Michael Eisen)

Podcast: Everything Hertz (LS 42 · TOP 2% what is this?)
Episode: 123: Authenticated anonymity (with Michael Eisen)
Pub date: 2021-01-04

Part two of our chat with Michael Eisen (eLife Editor-in-Cheif), in which we discuss the pros and cons of collaborative peer review, journal submission interfaces, Michael’s take on James’ proposal that peer reviewers should be paid $450 dollars, why negative comments on peer reviews need to be normalised, plus much more.

Some more details:

  • The pros and cons of collaborative peer review (in which all peer reviewers discuss the paper after all individual peer reviews have been submitted
  • How technology can constrain journal operations
  • The strange engineered delay in paper reviews (I doesn’t take 2-3 weeks to review a paper)
  • Michael’s proposal for a system in which people can nominate they have time in the near future to review a paper and then papers can be sent to them so they’re rapidly reviewed
  • Journal submission interfaces
  • Michael’s take on paying peer reviewers
  • Who owns peer reviews?
  • Would negative (anonomous or not) comments on an open peer review report penalise authors in the future?
  • Every paper gets negative peer-review comments, this doesn’t necessarily mean it’s a bad paper
  • Michael proposes an explicit “speculation” section for papers, where authors get free reign to basically say whatever they want

Other links

Music credits: [Lee Rosevere](freemusicarchive.org/music/Lee_Rosevere/)


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Episode citation

Special Guest: Michael Eisen.

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The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Dan Quintana, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

Audio

Stories of COVID-19: Love, Part 2

Podcast: The Story Collider (LS 58 · TOP 0.5% what is this?)
Episode: Stories of COVID-19: Love, Part 2
Pub date: 2021-02-01

In Part 2 of this episode, we’re sharing two more stories about the powerful love that has sustained us throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. As always, find transcripts and photos from these stories on our website.

First, we’ll hear from journalist and Story Collider senior producer Misha Gajewski. In her story, Misha takes her father to his chemo appointment early in the pandemic, and reckons with their shifting roles.

And then, the final story of this Stories of COVID-19 series, from infectious disease researcher Youssef Saklawi! When Youssef’s research team launches a COVID-19 study, he becomes immersed in his work — and begins to feel attached to the patients he sees only through glass.

We hope you enjoyed our first Stories of COVID-19 series! Over the next few months, we’ll be airing biweekly bonus episodes featuring stories on other topics, but we’re hard at work on our next Stories of COVID-19 series. If you would like to pitch a story for inclusion, see our Submissions page.

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Erin Barker, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.