Audio

Roadmapping Science with Adam Marblestone [Idea Machines #26]

Podcast: Idea Machines (LS 29 · TOP 10% what is this?)
Episode: Roadmapping Science with Adam Marblestone [Idea Machines #26]
Pub date: 2020-04-20

In this episode I talk to Adam Marblestone about technology roadmapping, scientific gems hidden in plain sight, and systematically exploring complex systems. Adam is currently a research scientist at Google DeepMind and in the past has been the chief strategy officer at a brain-computer interface company and did research on brain mapping with Ed Boyden and did his PhD with George Church. He has a repeated pattern of pushing the frontiers in one discipline after another – physics, biology, neuroscience, and now artificial intelligence. I wanted to talk to Adam not just because it’s fascinating when people are able to push the frontier in multiple disciplines but because he does it through a system he calls technological roadmapping.

Most of our discussion is framed around two of Adam’s works – a presentation about roadmapping biology and his primer on climate technology. The conversation stands on its own, but taking a glance at them will definitely enhance the context. Links below.

Key Takeaways

  1. Technological roadmapping enables fields to escape local maxima
  2. It might be possible to systematically break down complex technical disciplines into basic constraints in order to construct these roadmaps
  3. Figuring out these constraints may also enable us to reboot stalled fields

Links

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Audio

Relationship-Rich Education

Podcast: Teaching in Higher Ed (LS 52 · TOP 0.5% what is this?)
Episode: Relationship-Rich Education
Pub date: 2020-10-15

Peter Felten and Leo Lambert talk about their new book Relationship-Rich Education on episode 331 of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast.

Quotes from the episode

Of all the places on college campuses where relationships take hold, the classroom is still the most important place.

We don’t use relational language to talk about how to go to college. And we need to do that.
-Leo Lambert

Relationships are high stakes for students both in college and after college.
-Leo Lambert

Of all the places on college campuses where relationships take hold, the classroom is still the most important place.
-Leo Lambert

They’re not asking us to solve all their problems, they just want to be seen as humans.
-Peter Felten

Audio

Undisciplined: Senses and Sensibility

Podcast: UnDisciplined
Episode: Undisciplined: Senses and Sensibility
Pub date: 2020-11-13


Without having a really good reason for doing so, nobody in their right mind would put a dead fish into a ziploc bag, attach it to wires to an electric stimulator, and release it into a tank with an electric eel. But thankfully, Kenneth Catania had a perfectly good reason for doing all of that. Or maybe he’s not in his right mind. Either way, the result was a revelation about the eel — evidence that eels don’t just use their capacity to stun prey with zaps of electricity to kill, but also to

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Utah Public Radio, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

Audio

27: The Circadian Rhythm

Podcast: Useful Science (LS 45 · TOP 1.5% what is this?)
Episode: 27: The Circadian Rhythm
Pub date: 2019-12-24

http://www.usefulscience.org/podcast/27

This week we’re talking about the Circadian Rhythm.

Music by Solomon Krause-Imlach.

Follow us @usefulsci or email us at podcast@usefulscience.org.

Show Notes

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Useful Science, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

Audio

The Minds of Single-celled Organisms – Jeremy Gunawardena

Podcast: Parsing Science: The unpublished stories behind the world’s most compelling science, as told by the researchers themselves. (LS 28 · TOP 10% what is this?)
Episode: The Minds of Single-celled Organisms – Jeremy Gunawardena
Pub date: 2020-03-17


Can even a single-celled organism truly learn? In Episode 70, Jeremy Gunawardena with the Department of Systems Biology at Harvard Medical School talks with us about his replication of an experiment originally conducted over a century ago, which suggested that at least one single-cell organism – the trumpet-shaped Stentor roeseli – is able to carry out surprisingly complex decision-making behaviors

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Parsing Science: The unpublished stories behind the world’s most compelling science, as told by the researchers themselves., which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

Audio

Siberian paleohistory

Podcast: The Insight (LS 51 · TOP 1% what is this?)
Episode: Siberian paleohistory
Pub date: 2020-08-06

Razib and Spencer discuss the geography, prehistory, and genetics, of Siberia. Also, the time Spencer experienced a Siberian winter!

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Insitome: Your guide to the story of you, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

Audio

The Grand Unified Theory of Rogue Waves

Podcast: Quanta Science Podcast (LS 47 · TOP 1% what is this?)
Episode: The Grand Unified Theory of Rogue Waves
Pub date: 2020-11-05


Rogue waves — enigmatic giants of the sea — were thought to be caused by two different mechanisms. But a new idea that borrows from the hinterlands of probability theory has the potential to predict them all.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Quanta Magazine, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

Audio

The troubling rise of facial recognition technology

Podcast: Nature Podcast (LS 59 · TOP 0.5% what is this?)
Episode: The troubling rise of facial recognition technology
Pub date: 2020-11-18

Scientists have grave concerns over ethical and societal impacts of facial-recognition technology. In this surveillance special, we dig into the details.

In this episode:

03:24 Standing up against ‘smart cities’

Cities across the globe are installing thousands of surveillance cameras equipped with facial recognition technology. Although marketed as a way to reduce crime, researchers worry that these systems are ripe for exploitation and are calling for strict regulations on their deployment.

Feature: Resisting the rise of facial recognition

17:44 The ethics of researching facial recognition technology

Despite concerns surrounding consent and use, researchers are still working on facial recognition technology. Can this sort of work be justified? We hear some of the debates going on in academia about this field of research.

Feature: The ethical questions that haunt facial-recognition research

25:02 What do researchers actually think?

Nature surveyed 480 researchers who have published papers on facial recognition, AI and computer science. The results revealed that many researchers think there’s a problem.

Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday.

 


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