Audio

Analogies, Context, and Zettleconversation with Joel Chan [Idea Machines #24]

Podcast: Idea Machines (LS 29 · TOP 10% what is this?)
Episode: Analogies, Context, and Zettleconversation with Joel Chan [Idea Machines #24]
Pub date: 2020-03-17


Intro

In this episode I talk to Joel Chan about cross-disciplinary knowledge transfer, zettlekasten, and too many other things to enumerate. Joel is an a professor in the University of Maryland’s College of Information Studies and a member of their Human-Computer Interaction Lab. His research focuses on understanding and creating generalizable configurations of people, computing, and information that augment human intelligence and creativity. Essentially, how can we expand our knowledge frontier faster and better. 

This conversation was also an experiment. Instead of a normal interview that’s mostly the host directing the conversation, Joel and I actually let the conversation be directed by his notes. We both use a note-taking system called a zettlekasten that’s based around densely linked notes and realized hat it might be interesting to record a podcast where the structure of the conversation is Joel walking through his notes around where his main lines of research originated.

For those of you who just want to hear a normal podcast, don’t worry – this episode listens like any other episode of idea machines. For those of you who are interested in the experiment, I’ve put a longer-than normal post-pod at the end of the episode.

Key Takeaways

  • Context and synthesis are two critical pieces of knowledge transfer that we don’t talk or think about enough.
  • There is so much exciting progress to be made in how we could generate and execute on new ideas.

Show Notes

More meta-experiments: An entry point to Joel’s Notes from our conversation

– Wright brothers – Wing warping – Control is core problem – Boxes have nothing to do with flying – George Vestral – velcro

scite.ai – Canonical way you’re supposed to do scientific literature – Even good practice – find the people via the literature – Incubation Effect – Infrastructure has no way of knowing whether a paper has been contradicted – No way to know whether paper has been Refuted, Corroborated or Expanded – Incentives around references – Herb Simon, Allen Newell – problem solving as searching in space – Continuum from ill structured problem to well structured problems – Figuring out the parameters, what is the goal state, what are the available moves – Cyber security is both cryptography and social engineering – How do we know what we know? – Only infrastructure we have for sharing is via published literature – Antedisciplinary Science – Consequences of science as a career – Art in science – As there is more literature fragmentation it’s harder to synthesize and actually figure out what the problem is – Canonical unsolved problems – List of unsolved problems in physics  – Review papers are: Hard to write and Career suicide – Formulating a problem requires synthesis – Three levels of synthesis 1. Listing citations 2. Listing by idea 3. Synthesis – Bloom’s taxonomy  – Social markers – yes I’ve read X it wasn’t useful – Conceptual flag citations – there may actually be no relation between claims and claims in paper – Types of knowledge synthesis and their criteria – If you’ve synthesized the literature you’ve exposed fractures in it – To formulate problem you need to synthesize, to synthesize you need to find the right pieces, finding the right pieces is hard – Individual synthesis systems:       – Zettlekasten       – Tinderbox system       – Roam

– Graveyard of systems that have tried to create centralized knowledge repository – The memex as the philosopher’s stone of computer science – Semantic web – Shibboleth words – Open problem – “What level of knowledge do you need in a discipline” – Feynman sense of knowing a word – Information work at interdisciplinary boundaries – carol palmer – Different modes of interdisciplinary research – “Surface areas of interaction”   – Causal modeling the Judea pearl sense – Sensemaking is moving from unstructured things towards more structured things and the tools matter

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Benjamin Reinhardt, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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#329 Luciano Floridi: Information, Knowledge, Science, and AI

Podcast: The Dissenter (LS 34 · TOP 5% what is this?)
Episode: #329 Luciano Floridi: Information, Knowledge, Science, and AI
Pub date: 2020-05-04

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Dr. Luciano Floridi is the OII‘s Professor of Philosophy and Ethics of Information at the University of Oxford, where he is also the Director of the Digital Ethics Lab of the Oxford Internet Institute, and Professorial Fellow of Exeter College. He is a Turing Fellow of the Alan Turing Institute (the UK national institute for data science and artificial intelligence) and Chair of its Data Ethics Group. Still in Oxford, he is Distinguished Research Fellow of the Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics and Senior Member of the Faculty of Philosophy, and Research Associate and Fellow in Information Policy of the Department of Computer Science. He’s also Adjunct Professor (“Distinguished Scholar in Residence”) of the Department of Economics, at the American University, Washington D.C. His research concerns primarily Digital Ethics (aka Information and Computer Ethics), the Philosophy of Information, and the Philosophy of Technology. His other research interests include Epistemology, Philosophy of Logic, and the History and Philosophy of Scepticism.

In this episode, we talk about the philosophy of information. We go through some of the main questions it deals with, and we have a wide-ranging conversation, dealing with topics from metaphysics, epistemology, philosophy of mind, and ethics.

Follow Dr. Floridi’s work:

Faculty page: http://bit.ly/2Rl1y8C

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Twitter handle: @Floridi

A HUGE THANK YOU TO MY PATRONS/SUPPORTERS: KARIN LIETZCKE, ANN BLANCHETTE, PER HELGE LARSEN, LAU GUERREIRO, JERRY MULLER, HANS FREDRIK SUNDE, BERNARDO SEIXAS, HERBERT GINTIS, RUTGER VOS, RICARDO VLADIMIRO, BO WINEGARD, CRAIG HEALY, OLAF ALEX, PHILIP KURIAN, JONATHAN VISSER, DAVID DIAS, ANJAN KATTA, JAKOB KLINKBY, ADAM KESSEL, MATTHEW WHITINGBIRD, ARNAUD WOLFF, TIM HOLLOSY, HENRIK AHLENIUS, JOHN CONNORS, PAULINA BARREN, FILIP FORS CONNOLLY, DAN DEMETRIOU, ROBERT WINDHAGER, RUI INACIO, ARTHUR KOH, ZOOP, MARCO NEVES, MAX BEILBY, COLIN HOLBROOK, SUSAN PINKER, THOMAS TRUMBLE, PABLO SANTURBANO, SIMON COLUMBUS, PHIL KAVANAGH, JORGE ESPINHA, CORY CLARK, AND MARK BLYTH!

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AND TO MY EXECUTIVE PRODUCER, MICHAL RUSIECKI!

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Ricardo Lopes, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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The Urgent Need to Reinvest in American Research, with Barbara Snyder

Podcast: Big Brains (LS 49 · TOP 1% what is this?)
Episode: The Urgent Need to Reinvest in American Research, with Barbara Snyder
Pub date: 2021-01-14

Our podcast is all about research. Every episode we investigate what scholars have discovered and why it matters. But we’re going to get meta on this episode and look at what makes this research possible—and the dangers of taking it for granted, especially during crises like the COVID-19 pandemic.

Barbara Snyder, JD’80, is president of the Association of American Universities (AAU), an organization composed of America’s leading research universities. On this episode, she lays out the case for investing more in academic research, and what we may lose if we don’t.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from UCPN, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

Audio

161: Six Ed Tech Tools to Try in 2021

Podcast: The Cult of Pedagogy Podcast (LS 65 · TOP 0.1% what is this?)
Episode: 161: Six Ed Tech Tools to Try in 2021
Pub date: 2021-01-11

The yearly roundup of tools includes an audio feedback tool, sites to combat racism and media bias, and an app that lets you Google things in mid-air.

This episode is sponsored by Kialo Edu and National Geographic Education.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Jennifer Gonzalez, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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029. Tenure Tracker: Choose a Mentor, Not a Lab w/ Natasha Snider, PhD (R)

Podcast: Hello PhD (LS 44 · TOP 1.5% what is this?)
Episode: 029. Tenure Tracker: Choose a Mentor, Not a Lab w/ Natasha Snider, PhD (R)
Pub date: 2020-12-16

Choosing a lab for your graduate or postdoc research is one of the most important decisions you’ll make. Most people read papers and abstracts to find the coolest science.  Or they favor the big labs with lots of people and solid funding.

But those features can distract you from the real secret of scientific success.

Your Mentor Matters

Dr. Natasha Snider, PhD

This week on the show, we kick off a new series where we interview the people with truly alternative careers – the tenure track faculty!  Josh sits down with Natasha Snider, Assistant Professor of Cell Biology and Physiology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

As a recent faculty hire (just over 1 year), Dr. Snider remembers all the details of graduate school and postdoc life that contributed to her success, and shares them on the show.

First and foremost, she recalls the importance of good mentors in her scientific training.  Rather than choosing high-profile labs or being drawn into the latest research craze, she assessed the character of the PI and the culture of the lab.

“[I did one interview with] one of the brilliant scientists where you know you’re going to get these hot papers, but one of the first things he said was that he doesn’t yell at his people as much as he used to… After that, I sat through the interview but I knew that wasn’t [the lab for me]”

Aside from obvious anger issues, Dr. Snider shares the warning signs of monster mentors (those are anagrams!), and what type of lab environment you should seek instead.

Good mentors were a foundation for her training, but she also took every opportunity to explore other careers and to build a solid network.  She talks about the importance of meeting as many scientists as possible, and tells the story of how she decided to take a faculty position instead of an industry job.

A foraging we will go

And to celebrate the first cold-snap of the season, we enjoy the Fullsteam Brewery – First Frost 2015 Foraged Persimmon Ale.  If you haven’t gotten around to foraging your own persimmons this season, then you’re probably too late, and this high-gravity brew is your best bet for sampling the “Fruit of the Gods.”

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Joshua Hall and Daniel Arneman, PhDz, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

Audio

“Other” Options in Science and Companies with Cindy Wu and Denny Luan [Idea Machines #17]

Podcast: Idea Machines (LS 29 · TOP 10% what is this?)
Episode: “Other” Options in Science and Companies with Cindy Wu and Denny Luan [Idea Machines #17]
Pub date: 2019-06-17

Cindy Wu and Denny Luan are the founders of experiment.com – a platform that allows anybody to request funding for a science project and anybody to fund them. It’s fascinating because it stands completely outside of the grant funding and publication system that drives most science today. In this podcast we discuss how the current system prevents the creating of new fields, why science communication may be even more important that science funding, and new models for company governance. 

Key Takeaways

  • The incentives built into the grant system make it hard for new fields to emerge
  • Arguably, changing how science is communicated might have the biggest impact on our knowledge creation system.
  • The concept of ownership and governance of companies being two separate axes that need to be considered separately

Resources

Experiment.com

The Science of Science Funding

DIY biohackers trying to see infrared with vitamin A

Innocentive

Public benefit corporation

Purpose Trusts

Wellcome Trust/Foundation

Employee Owned Breweries

Topics

  • Consolidation and risk aversion in science
  • Hard to fund research outside of funding buckets
  • Field politics
  • Hard for younger scientists to get funding
  • NIH budget stayed the same, proposals have doubled
  • Government funds what’s popular
  • CERN is a consortium of companies doing funding
  • Only real solution is disseminating knowledge
  • DIY biohackers trying to see infrared with vitamin A
  • Digging up dinosaurs
  • No money to prepare dinosaur bones
  • Incentives for science
  • Brewery example of employee owned corporation
  • New models for funding businesses
  • Ownership and Governence Axes
  • Making scientists stakeholders in
  • Danger of masking philanthropy as investment and vice versa
  • Would VCs ever fund something that’s not purely for profit
  • New Company structures

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Benjamin Reinhardt, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

Audio

BS 176 Seth Grant on Synapse Complexity

Podcast: Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone (LS 60 · TOP 0.5% what is this?)
Episode: BS 176 Seth Grant on Synapse Complexity
Pub date: 2020-09-25

This is my fifth interview with molecular biologist and neuroscientist Dr. Seth Grant from The University of Edinburgh. Dr. Grant was recently recognized for his pioneering work by the  Federation of European Neuroscientists. He continues to make fundamental discoveries about the structure and function of the synapse and this month we discuss the discovery that synapse complexity and diversity is greater than expected, along with the  implications of these discoveries. 

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The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Ginger Campbell, MD, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Rehabilitation Counseling – Fostering a Better Quality of Life for People with Disabilities

Podcast: EdFix Podcast (LS 26 · TOP 10% what is this?)
Episode: Rehabilitation Counseling – Fostering a Better Quality of Life for People with Disabilities
Pub date: 2021-01-08

Rehabilitation counselors provide independent living support and job readiness training for people with disabilities, empowering them to integrate more fully into the community. According to Drs. Maureen McGuire-Kuletz and Kenneth Hergenrather, directors of the Center for Rehabilitation Counseling Research and Education, there is a pressing need for more rehabilitation professionals as a generation of counselors prepares to retire. They discuss the intersection of disability and poverty, why this population has been disproportionately affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, and what can be done to address these challenges. 

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Michael J. Feuer, Dean of the GW Graduate School of Education and Human Dev, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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