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Episode 4: Neuroeconomics, Addiction, and the Power of Accidental Findings with Dr. Brian Knutson

Podcast: Psychology In Action Podcast (LS 27 · TOP 10% what is this?)
Episode: Episode 4: Neuroeconomics, Addiction, and the Power of Accidental Findings with Dr. Brian Knutson
Pub date: 2018-04-27


For our fourth episode, the PIA crew interviewed Dr. Brian Knutson, a Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience at Stanford University. We explored strategies to get an “under the hood” view of human emotions, including a discussion of neuroeconomics, insights into addiction science, and how brain reactivity can predict future decision making.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Psychology In Action Podcast, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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133. Galileo and the Science Deniers – with Dr. Mario Livio

Podcast: Hello PhD (LS 44 · TOP 1.5% what is this?)
Episode: 133. Galileo and the Science Deniers – with Dr. Mario Livio
Pub date: 2020-05-14

Four hundred years ago, Galileo Galilei knelt before a group of Cardinals of the Catholic Church and was forced to recant his heretical belief that the Earth revolves around the sun.

“This must have been horrific for him,” says Dr. Mario Livio, author of a new biography titled Galileo and the Science Deniers. “To basically disavow everything he strongly believed in as a scientist.”

This week on the show, we talk with Dr. Livio about Galileo’s life and struggles, and what his experience can teach us about the science deniers living in our own time.

Finding the Center

Galileo was an Italian astronomer, physicist, and polymath who lived and studied in Italy around the turn of the seventeenth century.

He may be best known for an experiment that he probably didn’t actually do – the apocryphal tale of Galileo dropping different objects off the side of the Leaning Tower of Pisa to see how they would accelerate.

But Galileo’s astronomical observations, and the conflict they produced, take center stage in Dr. Livio’s new book. It’s a story that surprisingly few people have heard.

“Galileo is one of the most fascinating personalities in history. While everybody has heard about Galileo, I discovered that very few people actually know exactly what happened to him,” Livio recalls.

Dr. Mario Livio, author of Galileo and the Science Deniers

The book begins as a straightforward biography, describing Galileo’s early years, studying and teaching at Universities around Italy. But as the chapters progress, the reader begins to pick up on the faint but steady drumbeat of Galileo’s impending battle.

Dr. Livio sets the stage: “Aristotle and Ptolemy had a geocentric model of the solar system, in which the Earth was at the center and everything else revolved around the Earth. And the Catholic Church, over the years, adopted this particular model as its orthodoxy.”

“Copernicus changed that by suggesting that the sun is actually at the center, and the Earth and all the other planets revolve around the sun. And that’s where Galileo enters the scene.”

The book describes Galileo’s astronomical observations that built a case for the heliocentric model of Copernicus. The reader gets to follow along on this path of discovery, observing Galileo as he observes the Phases of Venus, or spots circling the sun, and draws new conclusions about the position of our planet in the solar system.

The Road to Rome

But inevitably, Galileo’s research and writings come to the attention of the Church, and his trajectory is locked on a path toward conflict with Pope Urban VIII.

Through a series of Papal threats, legal injunctions, and a three-phase trial that reads like the script of an episode of Law & Order, Galileo is found “vehemently suspect of heresy” for asserting that the Earth revolves around the sun.

He must choose between recanting these views or being labeled a heretic – a title that would lead to his torture and death.

Nearing seventy years of age,

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Joshua Hall and Daniel Arneman, PhDz, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Letting Loose Your Inner Reviewer Two

Podcast: The Black Goat (LS 42 · TOP 2% what is this?)
Episode: Letting Loose Your Inner Reviewer Two
Pub date: 2019-12-12

Peer review is a major part of how science works today. In this episode we talk about how we approach doing peer reviews. How do you distinguish between differences in approach or preference – “I would have done it a different way” – versus things that you should treat as objections? How much weight do you put on different considerations – the importance of the research question, the novelty, the theory, the methods, the results, and other factors? What’s your actual process – do you read front-to-back, or jump around? How much do you edit and wordsmith your reviews? When there are appendices, supplements, open code and materials, and preregistrations, which things do you read and how do you factor them in? How do you think about your potential biases and how to mitigate them? Plus: We answer a letter about deciding whether to pursue a postdoc versus other options.

The Black Goat is hosted by Sanjay Srivastava, Alexa Tullett, and Simine Vazire. Find us on the web at www.theblackgoatpodcast.com, on Twitter at @blackgoatpod, on Facebook at facebook.com/blackgoatpod/, and on instagram at @blackgoatpod. You can email us at letters@theblackgoatpodcast.com. You can subscribe to us on iTunes or Stitcher.

Our theme music is Peak Beak by Doctor Turtle, available on freemusicarchive.org under a Creative Commons noncommercial attribution license. Our logo was created by Jude Weaver.

This is episode 71. It was recorded on December 6, 2019.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Sanjay Srivastava, Alexa Tullett, and Simine Vazire, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Neutrinos give insights into the workings of the Sun’s core

Podcast: Nature Podcast (LS 59 · TOP 0.5% what is this?)
Episode: Neutrinos give insights into the workings of the Sun’s core
Pub date: 2020-11-25

Scientists have finally confirmed the existence of a CNO cycle fusion reaction in the Sun, and why women’s contraception research needs a reboot.

In this episode:

00:47 Detection of CNO neutrinos

Since the 1930s it has been theorised that stars have a specific fusion reaction known as the CNO cycle, but proof has been elusive. Now, a collaboration in Italy report detection of neutrinos that show that the CNO cycle exists.

Research article: The Borexino Collaboration

News and Views: Neutrino detection gets to the core of the Sun

08:48 Coronapod

We discuss the search for the animal origin of SARS-CoV-2, with researchers raiding their freezer draws to see if any animals carry similar viruses, and the latest vaccine results.

News: Coronaviruses closely related to the pandemic virus discovered in Japan and Cambodia

News: Why Oxford’s positive COVID vaccine results are puzzling scientists

19:32 Research Highlights

How sleep patterns relate to ageing, and a solar-powered steam sterilizer.

Research Highlight: For better health, don’t sleep your age

Research Highlight: Technology for sterilizing medical instruments goes solar

21:50 Getting women’s contraception research unstuck

Since the 1960s there has been little progress on research into women’s contraceptives. This week in Nature, researchers argue that this needs to change.

Comment: Reboot contraceptives research — it has been stuck for decades

29:35 Briefing Chat

We discuss a highlight from the Nature Briefing. This time, a tool to summarise papers.

Nature News: tl;dr: this AI sums up research papers in a sentence

Try the TLDR tool yourself!

Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday.

 


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The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Springer Nature Limited, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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#97 Natalia Bielczyk Story

Podcast: PhD Career Stories (LS 27 · TOP 10% what is this?)
Episode: #97 Natalia Bielczyk Story
Pub date: 2020-04-10

Welcome to a new podcast in PhD Career Stories. In today’s podcast, Dr. to be Natalia Bielczyk shares her journey from her homeland Poland to the Netherlands and the different steps she took to become an entrepreneur. Natalia is just about to get her PhD in Neuroscience at the Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition, and Behavior in Nijmegen. In 2018, she launched a foundation, Stichting Solaris Onderzoek en Ontwikkeling, that offers free consultancy to early career researchers interested in self-development or search for new careers in industry. Furthermore, in 2019, Natalia established, Welcome Solutions, a company that helps researchers to develop careers beyond academia. She also wrote a book entitled “What is out there for me? The landscape of post-PhD career tracks.“ Natalia brings us to a journey of self-discovery and recalls how she navigated herself from academia towards the open job market to finally become an entrepreneur.

Academic CV: https://www.nataliabielczyk.com/archive

Stichting Solaris: https://stichting-solaris.github.io/

Welcome Solutions: https://welcome-solutions.com/

Book: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B082YCHJHP

To know more about Natalia´s journey, listen to this episode. If you also have a story to be told or if you know someone, please don´t hesitate to contact us.

Enjoy listening!

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Tina Persson, Michele Manzo, Maria Sjogren, Paulius Mikulskis, Johanna Have, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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126. Listener Mailbag – Ghost PIs, Dress Codes, and Mental Health with Susanna Harris

Podcast: Hello PhD (LS 44 · TOP 1.5% what is this?)
Episode: 126. Listener Mailbag – Ghost PIs, Dress Codes, and Mental Health with Susanna Harris
Pub date: 2020-01-24

It’s that time again – the virtual mail bag is overflowing, so we invited Susanna Harris of PhDBalance.com to help us answer YOUR emails, Tweets, and messages.

Bringing the Heat

We start with a few burning questions about applications and interviews.

The first question comes from a listener who was promised a strong letter of recommendation by research PI, but when the application period rolled around, the PI was ‘too busy’ to write the letter.

What should I do when I can’t get ahold of the PI? Maybe he is purposely ghosting me… How do I explain this situation without sounding like I am bad mouthing the PI if I get asked about this? Please help. 

Susanna, Josh, and Daniel spend some time describing why those letters of recommendation are so important, and lay out plans A, B, and C for what to do when the PI just won’t deliver.

Next, we hear from a listener who is embarking on her first interviews, and wants to know what to wear!

 I have received my first interview invitations for biomedical umbrella programs and I realize I don’t know what I should wear to these events. I realize some of the activities during an interview weekend are more informal, but how formally should I be dressed for the faculty interviews?

The answer is not quite as cut-and-dried as you may think – different universities, even within a single city, can have different expectations.

We talk about what you should definitely NOT wear, and offer some guidelines on how to look professional while still feeling comfortable.

Finally, we hear from a student who suffered a major setback. Due to a traumatic event, she had to leave school for a period of time, and failed several classes in the process.

Fortunately, she’s recovering and back to finish her senior year. But she’s concerned that the low grades and gap in her transcript will prevent her from going to graduate school.

Moreover, she doesn’t know how to talk about this event that so challenged her life.

My main question is how do you frame personal and difficult life experiences when asked about them in interviews, applications, etc? I know that I am driven, tenacious, and ready to pursue a graduate degree but unsure how to frame my past experience to my advantage. I am also unsure of how to anticipate others’ reactions if I do speak candidly. I know that I have an empowering story but am finding it hard to balance oversharing and not being detailed enough. I don’t want to seem like I am flaky or give up when facing a challenge, which is how it currently appears on my transcript. I would be interested in hearing from graduate students with similar experiences of taking a mental health break from university life and later returning. 

We answer those questions, and more, this week on the show. In fact, we had SO many listener questions this week, we’ll be back next time with more of your inquiries and more Susanna Harris!

To hear more from Susanna, check out these epsiodes:

110: The Secret Life of Pets (in Grad School)

100: The One Where We Celebrate

093…

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Joshua Hall and Daniel Arneman, PhDz, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Silence: Stories about finding our voices

Podcast: The Story Collider (LS 58 · TOP 0.5% what is this?)
Episode: Silence: Stories about finding our voices
Pub date: 2019-10-11

This week we present two stories about the sounds that silence can take on.

Part 1: Kambri Crews attempts to smuggle a gift into prison for her father, who is deaf.

Part 2: As Kristine Lycke enters kindergarten, her mother starts treatment for a mysterious illness.

Kambri Crews once lived with her deaf parents in a tin shed in Montgomery, Texas. She now owns and operates the performance venue Q.E.D. in Astoria, Queens. Kambri is also a renowned storyteller and the author of the critically acclaimed and New York Times best selling memoir Burn Down the Ground (Random House). She has performed on The Moth (MainStage & radio), Women of Letters, Risk! and Mortified. In 2014, Kambri opened QED, a performance venue meets community and learning center. With over 100 events per month ranging from comedy, storytelling and music to classes like embroidery, cartooning and writing, there is something for everyone. Since its opening, QED has been featured on The Jim Gaffigan Show, NY1, The New York and LA Times and countless other media outlets. Performers have included the super famous like Leslie Jones, Kate McKinnon, Janeane Garofalo, to the first-time performer and everyone in between. Also a public speaker, Kambri has given speeches for Girls, Inc., University of Texas, Texas Book Festival, University of Oregon, SXSW (South by Southwest), DeafHope, and many other schools, colleges, book festivals, and events.

Kristine Lycke is a Daughter, Mother, Survivor, Warrior. She holds an Honors B.S. Degree in Applied Psychology from Farmingdale State College, which she received – along with the 2017 SUNY Chancellor’s Award for Student Excellence- just 3 years after completing treatment for Stage III Invasive Ductal Carcinoma (breast cancer). Cancer has always been a part of Kristine’s life, having lost her mother to the disease when she was only 8 years old. Wanting to give back to the facility that saved her life, Kristine works as a Patient Care Coordinator at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. When she is not working, Kristine enjoys spending time with her wife and learning far more about My Little Pony than she ever thought possible from their 6 year old daughter.

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The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Erin Barker, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Becoming a Minority

Podcast: Teaching in Higher Ed (LS 52 · TOP 0.5% what is this?)
Episode: Becoming a Minority
Pub date: 2020-08-20

Renea Brathwaite shares about his experience of “becoming a minority” on episode 323 of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast.

Quotes from the episode

Where you start is not where you will end up.

Where you start is not where you will end up.
-Renea Brathwaite

My core identity was formed and reinforced with value systems that valued me.
-Renea Brathwaite

Until that anger gets deeply seeded in a common humanity, it will just be anger and it becomes misplaced.
-Renea Brathwaite