Audio

“Other” Options in Science and Companies with Cindy Wu and Denny Luan [Idea Machines #17]

Podcast: Idea Machines (LS 29 · TOP 10% what is this?)
Episode: “Other” Options in Science and Companies with Cindy Wu and Denny Luan [Idea Machines #17]
Pub date: 2019-06-17

Cindy Wu and Denny Luan are the founders of experiment.com – a platform that allows anybody to request funding for a science project and anybody to fund them. It’s fascinating because it stands completely outside of the grant funding and publication system that drives most science today. In this podcast we discuss how the current system prevents the creating of new fields, why science communication may be even more important that science funding, and new models for company governance. 

Key Takeaways

  • The incentives built into the grant system make it hard for new fields to emerge
  • Arguably, changing how science is communicated might have the biggest impact on our knowledge creation system.
  • The concept of ownership and governance of companies being two separate axes that need to be considered separately

Resources

Experiment.com

The Science of Science Funding

DIY biohackers trying to see infrared with vitamin A

Innocentive

Public benefit corporation

Purpose Trusts

Wellcome Trust/Foundation

Employee Owned Breweries

Topics

  • Consolidation and risk aversion in science
  • Hard to fund research outside of funding buckets
  • Field politics
  • Hard for younger scientists to get funding
  • NIH budget stayed the same, proposals have doubled
  • Government funds what’s popular
  • CERN is a consortium of companies doing funding
  • Only real solution is disseminating knowledge
  • DIY biohackers trying to see infrared with vitamin A
  • Digging up dinosaurs
  • No money to prepare dinosaur bones
  • Incentives for science
  • Brewery example of employee owned corporation
  • New models for funding businesses
  • Ownership and Governence Axes
  • Making scientists stakeholders in
  • Danger of masking philanthropy as investment and vice versa
  • Would VCs ever fund something that’s not purely for profit
  • New Company structures

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Benjamin Reinhardt, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

Audio

BS 176 Seth Grant on Synapse Complexity

Podcast: Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone (LS 60 · TOP 0.5% what is this?)
Episode: BS 176 Seth Grant on Synapse Complexity
Pub date: 2020-09-25

This is my fifth interview with molecular biologist and neuroscientist Dr. Seth Grant from The University of Edinburgh. Dr. Grant was recently recognized for his pioneering work by the  Federation of European Neuroscientists. He continues to make fundamental discoveries about the structure and function of the synapse and this month we discuss the discovery that synapse complexity and diversity is greater than expected, along with the  implications of these discoveries. 

Links and References:

 

Please Visit Our Sponsors:

Announcements:

Connect on Social Media:

Contact Dr. Campbell:

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Ginger Campbell, MD, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

Audio

Rehabilitation Counseling – Fostering a Better Quality of Life for People with Disabilities

Podcast: EdFix Podcast (LS 26 · TOP 10% what is this?)
Episode: Rehabilitation Counseling – Fostering a Better Quality of Life for People with Disabilities
Pub date: 2021-01-08

Rehabilitation counselors provide independent living support and job readiness training for people with disabilities, empowering them to integrate more fully into the community. According to Drs. Maureen McGuire-Kuletz and Kenneth Hergenrather, directors of the Center for Rehabilitation Counseling Research and Education, there is a pressing need for more rehabilitation professionals as a generation of counselors prepares to retire. They discuss the intersection of disability and poverty, why this population has been disproportionately affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, and what can be done to address these challenges. 

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Michael J. Feuer, Dean of the GW Graduate School of Education and Human Dev, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

Audio

To Pay Attention, the Brain Uses Filters, Not a Spotlight

Podcast: Quanta Science Podcast (LS 48 · TOP 1% what is this?)
Episode: To Pay Attention, the Brain Uses Filters, Not a Spotlight
Pub date: 2020-08-27


A brain circuit that suppresses distracting sensory information holds important clues about attention and other cognitive processes.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Quanta Magazine, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

Audio

Mental Health on the College Campus

Podcast: Teaching in Higher Ed (LS 52 · TOP 0.5% what is this?)
Episode: Mental Health on the College Campus
Pub date: 2020-07-09

Laura Horne shares about student mental health – creating a culture of caring on episode 317 of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast.

Quotes from the episode

I don’t think that we really always realize how common mental health issues are.

I don’t think that we really always realize how common mental health issues are.
-Laura Horne

We all have some degree of personal experience with what it is like to struggle emotionally.
-Laura Horne

Learning is curiosity, it is relational, it is alive.
-Laura Horne

Asking for help is a sign of strength and it is necessary.
-Laura Horne

Audio

Silencing an ALS Gene – Tim Miller

Podcast: Parsing Science: The unpublished stories behind the world’s most compelling science, as told by the researchers themselves. (LS 29 · TOP 10% what is this?)
Episode: Silencing an ALS Gene – Tim Miller
Pub date: 2020-11-10


How could a gene that causes one type of ALS be switched off? In episode 87, Tim Miller from the Washington University in St. Louis discusses his research into therapies that target the single strands of DNA or RNA which cause many cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as ALS or Lou Gehrig’s disease.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Parsing Science: The unpublished stories behind the world’s most compelling science, as told by the researchers themselves., which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

Audio

Episode 37: Sounds of Innovation 1

Podcast: Voices from DARPA (LS 42 · TOP 2% what is this?)
Episode: Episode 37: Sounds of Innovation 1
Pub date: 2020-12-21

 

Welcome to Sounds of Innovation, a new intermittent feature of our Voices from DARPA podcast. Rather than hearing the voices of program managers, which is normally what you get in a Voices from DARPA podcast, in each Sounds of Innovation episode, you will hear some of the soundscapes of research and development…and learn just a little bit about what new world-changing capabilities those sounds could lead to.

 

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from DARPA, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

Audio

Learn to code to boost your research career

Podcast: Working Scientist (LS 29 · TOP 10% what is this?)
Episode: Learn to code to boost your research career
Pub date: 2019-04-11

Learning how to coding brings career benefits and helps science by aiding reproducibility, Julie Gould discovers.

Jessica Hedge tells Julie Gould about how she learned to code as a PhD student, and the freedom and flexibility it provides to manage large datasets.

“I never saw myself as a coder and it took me a long time to realise I had to pick up the skills myself,” she tells Julie Gould in the second episode of this six-part series about technology and scientific careers. “A colleague was using Python and R and I saw the potential.” What is her advice to other early career researchers who are keen to develop coding expertise?

Also, Brian MacNamee, an assistant professor in the school of computer science at University College Dublin, talks about the college’s data science course and how it can benefit both humanities and science students.

Finally, Nature technology editor Jeffrey Perkel describes how coding can help with computational reproducibility.

 


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The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Nature Careers, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.