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Planning a postdoc before moving to industry? Think again

Podcast: Working Scientist (LS 30 · TOP 10% what is this?)
Episode: Planning a postdoc before moving to industry? Think again
Pub date: 2020-12-03

Experience as a postdoctoral researcher might not fast-track your career outside academia, Julie Gould discovers.

Nessa Carey, a UK entrepreneur and technology-transfer professional whose career has straddled academia and industry, including a senior role at Pfizer, shares insider knowledge on how industry employers often view postdoctoral candidates. She also offers advice on CVs and preparing for interviews.

“It is very tempting sometimes for people to keep on postdoc-ing, especially if they have a lab head who has a lot of rolling budget and who likes having the same postdocs there, because they’re productive and they know them,” she says. “That’s great for the lab head. It’s typically very, very bad for the individual postdoc,” she adds.

Carey is joined by Shulamit Kahn, an economist at Boston University in Massachusetts, who co-authored a 2017 paper about the impact of postdoctoral training on early careers in biomedicine1.

According to the paper, published in Nature Biotechnology, employers did not financially value the training or skills obtained during postdoc training. “Based on these findings, the majority of PhDs would be financially better off if they skipped the postdoc entirely,” it concludes.

Malcolm Skingle, academic liaison at GlaxoSmithKline, adds: “You really will get people who have done their PhD, they’ve done a two-year postdoc, they think they’re pretty much going to run the world and single-handedly develop a drug.

“They have got no idea how difficult drug discovery is, and their place in that very big jigsaw.”

“And why don’t postdocs get great salaries straightaway? Well, actually, they haven’t proven themselves in our environment, where, if they’re any good, then their salaries will go up quite quickly.”

 


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150. Rediscover Your Scientific Passion

Podcast: Hello PhD (LS 45 · TOP 1.5% what is this?)
Episode: 150. Rediscover Your Scientific Passion
Pub date: 2021-02-16

Nadia wanted to help patients. She had considered going to medical school, but found biomedical research to be an exciting opportunity to develop new knowledge and therapies.

After graduate school, she continued her training as a postdoc. She was on the faculty-track, making plans for her project and her next career advancement.

Then, COVID hit.

She was living and working in New York City as the largest pandemic in a century unfolded around her. She realized she had developed some skills over her years of training – PCR, data management, lab operations – that might make a difference in patient outcomes.

So she pressed pause on her postdoctoral work to start a clinical testing lab that now runs 60,000 COVID tests each week.

Center of a Pandemic

Dr. Nadia Khan is a Postdoctoral Researcher at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City.

Dr. Nadia Khan, PhD

When the COVID-19 pandemic started, she realized that her experience preparing RNA samples and performing qPCR would be useful in performing COVID tests.

She reached out to her University, and got started preparing samples at the Mount Sinai COVID lab three days a week. But space was limited, and it wasn’t safe for her to continue working as a volunteer.

But the spark was already glowing: “I liked being able to use my scientific skills in a way that was useful tot he public in a time of need,” she recalls.

Charting a New Course

She teamed up with some contacts at a local biotech startup and forged a COVID testing lab to respond to the pandemic. She now manages nearly 30 employees and makes a sizable impact on COVID-19 in her community.

“I think I’ve always wanted to be a PI and have my own lab and direct a lab group, but now I’m starting to realize that I can be a scientific leader in a different way, and it doesn’t necessarily have to be in the academia world for me to feel successful,” she says.

Looking back at the path she took through her graduate training, Dr. Khan notes that “we only equate our successes with publications or getting awards, and we’re only really exposed to that. We only know one way to feel successful. Once you realize there are other ways to get that satisfaction, it opens doors for you. How else can I use my scientific skills in a way that makes me feel successful and makes me feel good about what I’m doing for the world?”

Her advice for early-stage scientists?

“Keep an open mind, and remember why you got into science.”

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Joshua Hall and Daniel Arneman, PhDz, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Ep13 – Trustworthy AI for Public Sector Applications with Farhana Faruqe

Podcast: The Weekly Regression
Episode: Ep13 – Trustworthy AI for Public Sector Applications with Farhana Faruqe
Pub date: 2021-05-05

In this episode, we are joined by Farhana Faruqe, a Data Scientist at Children’s National Health System and a Ph.D. candidate in Human-Technology Collaboration at The George Washington University.

Farhana outlines the various applications and developments in AI Ethics including Explainable AI and Trustworthy AI. We talk about what it means for a model or algorithm to be trustworthy and how we can mitigate risk at different stages of the data science pipeline. Finally, Farhana summarizes her recent publication “Monitoring Trust in Human-Machine Interactions for Public Sector Applications” where she measures people’s trust in Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning. 

Farhana Faruqe LinkedIn [https://www.linkedin.com/in/farhana-faruqe-98884013/]

Episode 9 w/ Larry Medsker HERE [https://theweeklyregression.buzzsprout.com/1630165/8286326-ep09-designing-ethical-ai-systems-with-dr-larry-medsker]

Follow the TWR Podcast on:
Instagram HERE [https://www.instagram.com/theweeklyregression/]
Twitter HERE [https://twitter.com/TheWeeklyReg]
LinkedIn HERE [https://www.linkedin.com/company/the-weekly-regres]

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Undisciplined: Of Puppets And Punishment

Podcast: UnDisciplined
Episode: Undisciplined: Of Puppets And Punishment
Pub date: 2021-02-12


Even if you’re a judge, a prosecutor or a police officer, you might not have given a lot of thought to the question of why we punish people. You might simply conclude that we punish people when they need to be punished. Developmental psychologist Julia Marshall isn’t satisfied with that sort of simplicity. We’ll talk to her about when and why we punish.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Utah Public Radio, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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165: Setting Up Mastery-Based Grading in Your Classroom

Podcast: The Cult of Pedagogy Podcast (LS 65 · TOP 0.1% what is this?)
Episode: 165: Setting Up Mastery-Based Grading in Your Classroom
Pub date: 2021-03-07

It’s a terrible feeling when you know some of your students didn’t really learn the content, but you move them on anyway. Mastery-based grading solves that problem by requiring students to actually master key concepts before progressing to the next stage. In this episode, Kareem Farah of the Modern Classrooms Project shows us how it’s done. 

This is the third and final episode of a three-part series that has taught us how to run a blended, self-paced, mastery-based model that works beautifully for remote, hybrid, or in-person learning. The first two episodes are 144, Making Great Screencast Videos, and 158, How to Create a Self-Paced Classroom. 

Join tens of thousands of other teachers who are learning how to implement the Modern Classrooms model by signing up for their free course (affiliate link).

——————-

Thanks so much to Hāpara and Kiddom for sponsoring this episode!

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Jennifer Gonzalez, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Hidden Computational Power Found in the Arms of Neurons

Podcast: Quanta Science Podcast (LS 48 · TOP 1% what is this?)
Episode: Hidden Computational Power Found in the Arms of Neurons
Pub date: 2020-10-22

The dendritic arms of some human neurons can perform logic operations that once seemed to require whole neural networks.

The post Hidden Computational Power Found in the Arms of Neurons first appeared on Quanta Magazine.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Quanta Magazine, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Why Fish Don’t Exist w/ Lulu Miller

Podcast: Talk Nerdy with Cara Santa Maria (LS 60 · TOP 0.5% what is this?)
Episode: Why Fish Don’t Exist w/ Lulu Miller
Pub date: 2020-11-23


In this episode of Talk Nerdy, Cara is joined by science reporter, producer, and Radiolab co-host Lulu Miller to talk about her new book, “Why Fish Don’t Exist: A Story of Loss, Love, and the Hidden Order of Life.” Lulu shares the incredible story of taxonomist David Starr Jordan, and in doing so, opens up the conversation to the power and consequences of imposing order on the world around us in the form of labels, categories, and impossible constraints.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Cara Santa Maria, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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How to craft and communicate a simple science story

Podcast: Working Scientist (LS 30 · TOP 10% what is this?)
Episode: How to craft and communicate a simple science story
Pub date: 2020-07-17

Ditch jargon, keep sentences short, stay topical. Pakinam Amer shares the secrets of good science writing for books and magazines.

In the final episode of this six-part series about science communication, three experts describe how they learned to craft stories about research for newspaper, magazine and book readers.

David Kaiser, a physicist and science historian at Massachusetts Institute of Technology and author of the 2012 book How the Hippies Saved Physics, tells Amer how he first transitioned from academic writing to journalism. “This kind of writing is different from the kinds of communication I had been practising as a graduate student and young faculty member.

“It took other sets of eyes and skilled editors to very patiently and generously work with me, saying ‘These paragraphs are long, the sentences are long, you’ve buried the lede.’ It was quite a process, quite a transition. It took a lot of practice to work on new habits.”

David Berreby runs an annual science writing workshop at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Massachusetts. He adds: “One of the hardest things for scientists to do is to tell a story as they would to a friend on campus. If you run into someone in the hall you say ‘Hey, the most surprising thing happened….’

“Generally your instinct for how you would tell someome informally is a good guide. This is hard for scientists as it’s been trained out of them. They have been trained to formalise and jargonise.”

Beth Daley, editor of the The Conservation US, an online non-profit that publishes news and comment from academic researchers and syndicates them to different national and regional news outlets, describes how she and her colleagues commission articles.

After a daily 9am meeting, they issue an ‘expert call out’ seeking comment on that day’s news stories.

Her team also receives direct pitches from academics. “The question I always ask scientists is ‘What is it about your work that can be relevant for people today?” she says.

 


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