Audio

To Pay Attention, the Brain Uses Filters, Not a Spotlight

Podcast: Quanta Science Podcast (LS 48 · TOP 1% what is this?)
Episode: To Pay Attention, the Brain Uses Filters, Not a Spotlight
Pub date: 2020-08-27


A brain circuit that suppresses distracting sensory information holds important clues about attention and other cognitive processes.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Quanta Magazine, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

Audio

Mental Health on the College Campus

Podcast: Teaching in Higher Ed (LS 52 · TOP 0.5% what is this?)
Episode: Mental Health on the College Campus
Pub date: 2020-07-09

Laura Horne shares about student mental health – creating a culture of caring on episode 317 of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast.

Quotes from the episode

I don’t think that we really always realize how common mental health issues are.

I don’t think that we really always realize how common mental health issues are.
-Laura Horne

We all have some degree of personal experience with what it is like to struggle emotionally.
-Laura Horne

Learning is curiosity, it is relational, it is alive.
-Laura Horne

Asking for help is a sign of strength and it is necessary.
-Laura Horne

Audio

Silencing an ALS Gene – Tim Miller

Podcast: Parsing Science: The unpublished stories behind the world’s most compelling science, as told by the researchers themselves. (LS 29 · TOP 10% what is this?)
Episode: Silencing an ALS Gene – Tim Miller
Pub date: 2020-11-10


How could a gene that causes one type of ALS be switched off? In episode 87, Tim Miller from the Washington University in St. Louis discusses his research into therapies that target the single strands of DNA or RNA which cause many cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as ALS or Lou Gehrig’s disease.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Parsing Science: The unpublished stories behind the world’s most compelling science, as told by the researchers themselves., which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

Audio

Episode 37: Sounds of Innovation 1

Podcast: Voices from DARPA (LS 42 · TOP 2% what is this?)
Episode: Episode 37: Sounds of Innovation 1
Pub date: 2020-12-21

 

Welcome to Sounds of Innovation, a new intermittent feature of our Voices from DARPA podcast. Rather than hearing the voices of program managers, which is normally what you get in a Voices from DARPA podcast, in each Sounds of Innovation episode, you will hear some of the soundscapes of research and development…and learn just a little bit about what new world-changing capabilities those sounds could lead to.

 

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from DARPA, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

Audio

Learn to code to boost your research career

Podcast: Working Scientist (LS 29 · TOP 10% what is this?)
Episode: Learn to code to boost your research career
Pub date: 2019-04-11

Learning how to coding brings career benefits and helps science by aiding reproducibility, Julie Gould discovers.

Jessica Hedge tells Julie Gould about how she learned to code as a PhD student, and the freedom and flexibility it provides to manage large datasets.

“I never saw myself as a coder and it took me a long time to realise I had to pick up the skills myself,” she tells Julie Gould in the second episode of this six-part series about technology and scientific careers. “A colleague was using Python and R and I saw the potential.” What is her advice to other early career researchers who are keen to develop coding expertise?

Also, Brian MacNamee, an assistant professor in the school of computer science at University College Dublin, talks about the college’s data science course and how it can benefit both humanities and science students.

Finally, Nature technology editor Jeffrey Perkel describes how coding can help with computational reproducibility.

 


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Audio

65. Lara Schwartz, False Equivalence

Podcast: Half Hour of Heterodoxy (LS 46 · TOP 1% what is this?)
Episode: 65. Lara Schwartz, False Equivalence
Pub date: 2019-09-01

Lara Schwartz is the director of the Project for Civil Discourse at American University where she’s also a professor in law and government. She’s also the coauthor of How to College: What to Know Before You Go (And When You’re There). We talk about the problem of false equivalence (also termed false balance, both-sidesism, and both-siderism) in the classroom, and how college professors can address this problem.

Related Links:

* Project for Civil Discourse on Youtube* Can journalistic “false balance” distort public perception of consensus in expert opinion? by Derek J. Koehler, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied* Balance as Bias: Global Warming and the U.S. Prestige Press by M. T. Boykoff and J. M. Boykoff, Global Environmental Change* Journalistic Balance as Global Warming Bias by Jules Boykoff, Fairness and Accuracy in Resporting* Lara Schwartz on the 2019 Heterodox Academy conference panel, “Successes, Strains and Stories to Inspire.”

Here is a transcript of the episode.

Rating the Show

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See the full list of episodes of Half Hour of Heterodoxy >>

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Heterodox Academy, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

Audio

Inclusive Research Communication

Podcast: This Study Shows
Episode: Inclusive Research Communication
Pub date: 2020-10-26

Who tells the stories of science and who gets to learn from them? We’ve spent this year reckoning with inequity on all sides of research communication. From barriers that stop underserved communities from engaging with research, to biases that can exclude researchers from sharing their work. Listen to Dr. Sunshine Menezes, Executive Director of the Metcalf Institute at the University of Rhode Island, Professor Chris Jackson, Imperial College London, Sibusiso Biyela, a science communicator and columnist, and Lewis Hou, founder of Science Ceilidh discuss inclusive science communication. 
 
And keep learning about these issues with the help of the resources below: 

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Listen Entertainment & Wiley, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

Audio

581: Unraveling the Mechanisms Behind Memory in the Human Brain – Dr. Rodrigo Quian Quiroga

Podcast: People Behind the Science Podcast – Stories from Scientists about Science, Life, Research, and Science Careers (LS 51 · TOP 0.5% what is this?)
Episode: 581: Unraveling the Mechanisms Behind Memory in the Human Brain – Dr. Rodrigo Quian Quiroga
Pub date: 2020-11-30

Dr. Rodrigo Quian Quiroga is a Professor and Director of the Centre for Systems Neuroscience at the University of Leicester in the United Kingdom. He is also an author of the books Borges and Memory, Principles of Neural Coding, Imaging Brain Function with EEG, and The Forgetting Machine. Rodrigo is interested in understanding how memory works and how the brain works in general. He conducts experiments to determine how the neurons in our brain make us see, feel, make decisions, and remember the things we experience and learn in our lives. The memory research in Rodrigo’s lab investigates how memories are formed, stored, consolidated, and forgotten. Rodrigo also enjoys getting out of the lab to give his mind a break from thinking about experiments. In particular, he enjoys hanging out with his wife and kids, playing sports, and practicing Judo. Rodrigo received his undergraduate training in physics from the University of Buenos Aires in Argentina and was awarded his PhD in Applied Mathematics from the University of Luebeck in Germany. He was a postdoctoral fellow at the Research Center Juelich in Germany and he received a Sloan Fellowship to conduct research at the California Institute of Technology. Rodrigo also worked briefly at RIKEN in Japan and at the University of Nijmegen in The Netherlands. Rodrigo has received numerous awards and honors including the Royal Society Wolfson Research Merit Award, a Young Investigator Award from the American Epilepsy Society, and Rodrigo was also named one of 10 UK RISE Leaders in Science and Engineering in 2014. Rodrigo spoke with us about his experiences his career, research, and life.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Dr. Marie McNeely, featuring top scientists speaking about their life and c, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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