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123: Four Research-Based Strategies All Teachers Should Be Using


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Podcast: The Cult of Pedagogy Podcast
Episode: 123: Four Research-Based Strategies All Teachers Should Be Using
Pub date: 2019-06-09

Cognitive scientists are learning more all the time about what strategies really work to help people learn, but teachers don’t always know how to apply that knowledge in the classroom. In this episode, I talk with Pooja Agarwal and Patrice Bain, authors of the new book Powerful Teaching, about the four research-based teaching “power tools” that can be used in any classroom to boost student learning.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Jennifer Gonzalez, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Innovator Stories – Episode 4


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Podcast: Science: Disrupt
Episode: Innovator Stories – Episode 4
Pub date: 2019-06-22

What makes an innovator in the world of disrupting science? What sort of experiences, behaviours and mindsets prompt people to make change, and guard them against the challenges that changing the status quo inevitably brings?

Those were the questions on our mind for this first episode of our ‘Innovator Stories’ mini-series on the Science: Disrupt podcast.

Over the next 5 episodes of Science: Disrupt, you’ll hear from those at the coal face, enacting change within science – whether that’s building new products, changing behaviour in the lab or simply being more vocal in the scientific community, we wanted to bring to the fore some of the ‘behind the scenes’ insights into what makes innovation happen.

This episode features:

The series is supported by the awesome team at Digital Science’s Catalyst Grant – they’re constantly searching for the next big thing in scientific research software. To help nurture original, early stage ideas they created the Catalyst Grant where they offer up to £25,000 to help get your idea from concept to prototype. So, if you’ve got an idea to help further scientific research, then they’ve got the funding and resources to bring it to life. The next deadline for submission is June 30th, so get to it!

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Science: Disrupt, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Bending the Laws of Physics – Andreas Schilling


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Podcast: Parsing Science: The unpublished stories behind the world’s most compelling science, as told by the researchers themselves.
Episode: Bending the Laws of Physics – Andreas Schilling
Pub date: 2019-06-25


“Nothing in life is certain,” writes MIT mechanical engineer Seth Lloyd, “except death, taxes and the second law of thermodynamics.” But is this necessarily so? In episode 52, we’re joined by Andreas Schilling with the University of Zurich, who discusses his development of an amazingly simple device that allows heat to flow from a cold object to a warm one without an external power supply; a process that initially appears to contradict this fundamental law of physics.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Parsing Science: The unpublished stories behind the world’s most compelling science, as told by the researchers themselves., which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Design Thinking in Teaching and Research


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Podcast: Teaching in Higher Ed
Episode: Design Thinking in Teaching and Research
Pub date: 2019-10-10

Nicola Ulibarri explores Design Thinking in Teaching, Research, and Beyond on episode 274.

Quotes from the episode

Nicola Ulibarri explores Design Thinking in Teaching, Research, and Beyond on episode 274
Design thinking is a creative problem solving methodology that starts from understanding and addressing human needs.

-Nicola Ulibarri

Innovation is a learnable process.

-Nicola Ulibarri

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Ep 170: Dr. Larry Rosen on Technology and the Brain


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Podcast: Research in Action | A podcast for faculty & higher education professionals on research design, methods, productivity & more
Episode: Ep 170: Dr. Larry Rosen on Technology and the Brain
Pub date: 2019-09-09

On this episode, Katie is joined by Dr. Larry Rosen, Professor Emeritus and past chair of the psychology department at California State University, Dominguez Hills. He is a research psychologist recognized as an international expert in the “Psychology of Technology.” Over the past 30-plus years, Dr. Rosen and his colleagues have examined reactions to technology among more than 100,000 people in the United States and in 22 other countries. His latest book, The Distracted Mind: Ancient Brains in a High-Tech World (MIT Press, 2016), won the PROSE Award for neuroscience. Dr. Rosen has been featured extensively in television, print, and radio media and has been a commentator on 60 Minutes, The Daily Show, Good Morning America, NPR, and CNN. Dr. Rosen has four children including one in the iGeneration, one in the Net Generation and two in Generation X and four grandchildren to watch growing up with technology. For fun he creates works of art from old computer technology, clocks and early rock and roll music. In his free time he enjoys reading international intrigue novels, fiddling with his newest geek toy, going to independent films, and trying to find ways to keep his Humanware safe from the technology vying for his attention. His website is DrLarryRosen.com

 

Segment 1: Technology and the Brain [00:00-18:53]

In this first segment, Larry describes some of his research on the effect of technology on the brain.

In this segment, the following resources are mentioned:

Segment 2: Multitasking in the Classroom [18:54-37:11]

In segment two, Larry shares about his research study on multitasking in the classroom.

In this segment, the following resources are mentioned:

To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast:

Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111

If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review.

The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Dr. Katie Linder, Director of the Oregon State University Ecampus Research Unit, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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This Idea Must Die


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Podcast: Freakonomics Radio
Episode: This Idea Must Die
Pub date: 2015-03-05

Every year, Edge.org asks its salon of big thinkers to answer one big question. This year’s question borders on heresy: what scientific idea is ready for retirement?

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from ​Dubner Productions and Stitcher, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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The Closing of the American Mind, by Allan Bloom


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Podcast: Context with Brad Harris
Episode: The Closing of the American Mind, by Allan Bloom
Pub date: 2019-05-02

Allan Bloom’s The Closing of the American Mind, published in 1987, became one of the most influential books of the last 50 years by instigating a battle over the soul of the American University that’s been raging ever since.

The book sold millions of copies, becoming a powerful weapon in Bloom’s fight against what he identified as a morally and intellectually crippling form of relativism infecting America’s educational system. Allan Bloom sought to remind us that the goal of education is not to become open to all ideas, but to cultivate the search for the best ideas.

This episode was supported by KiwiCo, reimagining the way kids play and learn: https://kiwico.com/context

To access bonus episodes and all regular episodes ad-free: https://www.patreon.com/context

Learn more at https://bradharris.com

 

 

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Brad Harris, Historian, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Confidence: Stories about finding your voice


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Podcast: The Story Collider
Episode: Confidence: Stories about finding your voice
Pub date: 2019-05-03


This week we present two stories about people finding strength in their own voice.

Part 1:  A parent-teacher conference leads Eugenia Duodu to question whether she can be a scientist.

Part 2: At 13 years old Misha Gajewski has to undergo a jaw surgery to fix a face she is just getting used to.

Eugenia Duodu is the Toronto-based CEO of Visions of Science, which  inspires kids from low-income and marginalized communities to pursue  careers in STEM. As a youth born and raised in a low-income community,  she strives to maintain a strong connection to her local and global  community by being a mentor and advocate. Her goal is to help make a  long-lasting positive impact in communities through STEM engagement and  in-turn allow youth to unlock their potential. Eugenia holds a PhD in  Chemistry from the University of Toronto. 

Misha is a freelance journalist whose work has been featured on Vice,  BBC and CTV News, among others. She is also a journalism Professor at  Seneca College and a scriptwriter for the popular Youtube channel  SciShow. Misha has a degree in business and psychology from Western  University and a Masters in science journalism from City University  London. She also has a cat named Satan and when she’s not writing in her  pyjamas she can be found exploring the world or repurposing old  furniture. She is @mishagajewski 

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The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from The Story Collider, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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