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Behind the Curtain of Algorithms – Been Kim


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Podcast: Parsing Science: The unpublished stories behind the world’s most compelling science, as told by the researchers themselves.
Episode: Behind the Curtain of Algorithms – Been Kim
Pub date: 2019-07-10


Might we be better able to understand what’s going on inside the “black box” of machine learning algorithms? In episode 52, Been Kim from Google Brain talks with us about her research into creating algorithms that can explain why they make the recommendations they do via concepts that are relatable by their users.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Parsing Science: The unpublished stories behind the world’s most compelling science, as told by the researchers themselves., which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Episode 265 – Lucy Jones


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Podcast: Talk Nerdy with Cara Santa Maria
Episode: Episode 265 – Lucy Jones
Pub date: 2019-07-08


In this episode of Talk Nerdy, Cara sits down with Dr. Lucy Jones, founder of the Dr. Lucy Jones Center for Science and Society and author of the new book, “The Big Ones: How Natural Disasters Have Shaped Us (and What We Can Do About Them)”. They just so happened to record on the morning of July 5, 2019, between the magnitude 6.4 foreshock on July 4 and the magnitude 7.1 earthquake on July 5, 2019 in southern California. They discuss earthquake safety, seismology, and the psychological biases that prevent us from accurate risk assessment. Follow Lucy: @DrLucyJones.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Cara Santa Maria, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Strength: Stories about searching for what makes us strong


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Podcast: The Story Collider
Episode: Strength: Stories about searching for what makes us strong
Pub date: 2019-06-21

This week we present two stories of scientists having to find a strength within themselves.

Part 1: BiologistH eather Hamlin leaves the safety of the lab for her first field assignment: tagging alligators.

Part 2: As an unconsenting “face of diversity,” Dan Simpson contemplates the role of his gay identity in his academic life.

Heather Hamlin earned her BS in Biology, and an MS in Marine  Bio-resources from the University of Maine before working as a Senior Biologist at Mote Marine Laboratory in Sarasota Florida. She earned her  Ph.D. from the University of Florida in 2007, and then worked as a  post-doctoral scholar at the same institution studying the effects of  environmental pollutants on the endocrine system of aquatic animals. In  2010 she joined the Medical University of South Carolina’s School of Medicine as an Assistant Professor examining how contaminants can alter maternal-fetal health. Eager to get back to Maine, she returned in 2011  to the University of Maine’s School of Marine Sciences, where she is an  associate professor. Heather’s current research seeks to understand how  human-induced changes in the environment, whether it be climate change,  ocean acidification, or pollutants can affect the reproduction and  development of aquatic animals, many of which are important to Maine’s economy.

 

Dan Simpson is a statistician. He left Australia for Europe after his PhD in 2009 and is currently an Assistant Professor and the Canadian  Research Chair in Spatiotemporal Modelling at the University of Toronto. 

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The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from The Story Collider, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Don’t Be Told What You Want, Don’t Be Told What You Need


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Podcast: The Black Goat
Episode: Don’t Be Told What You Want, Don’t Be Told What You Need
Pub date: 2019-05-01

What if there were no journals? Would academic life be barren and empty, noisy and chaotic, happy and egalitarian, or something else entirely? In this episode we conduct an extended thought experiment about life without journals, in order to probe questions about what journals actually do for us anyway, what are other ways to achieve those things, and how we might overcome the downsides of the current scientific publishing ecosystem. How else could peer review work? How would researchers find information and know what to read? Would we just replace our current heuristics and biases with new ones? Plus: We answer a letter about whether to slow down to do higher-quality research or to focus on flashy results at top journals.

Links:

The Black Goat is hosted by Sanjay Srivastava, Alexa Tullett, and Simine Vazire. Find us on the web at www.theblackgoatpodcast.com, on Twitter at @blackgoatpod, on Facebook at facebook.com/blackgoatpod/, and on instagram at @blackgoatpod. You can email us at letters@theblackgoatpodcast.com. You can subscribe to us on iTunes or Stitcher.

Our theme music is Peak Beak by Doctor Turtle, available on freemusicarchive.org under a Creative Commons noncommercial attribution license. Our logo was created by Jude Weaver.

This is episode 57. It was recorded on April 17, 2019.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Sanjay Srivastava, Alexa Tullett, and Simine Vazire, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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104: Now we’ll discover which meetings could’ve been emails


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Podcast: Everything Hertz
Episode: 104: Now we’ll discover which meetings could’ve been emails
Pub date: 2020-03-16

Dan and James discuss the COVID-19 pandemic and how it’s impacting academia

Other things they discuss:

  • Roy and HG’s gymnastics commentary from the Sydney 2000 olympics
  • News tickers and collective anxiety
  • How will cancelled talks and events influence our careers?
  • Use the promo code “everythinghertz” to get $50 in free Prolific credit that you can use to recruit online participants for your next study, more details here
  • Using ‘Second Life’ for conferences
  • Tools for working from home
  • “It’s just a cough” skit

Other links

Music credits: [Lee Rosevere](freemusicarchive.org/music/Lee_Rosevere/)


Support us on Patreon and get bonus stuff!

  • $1 a month or more: Monthly newsletter + Access to behind-the-scenes photos & video via the Patreon app + the the warm feeling you’re supporting the show
  • $5 a month or more: All the stuff you get in the $1 tier PLUS a bonus mini episode every month (extras + the bits we couldn’t include in our regular episodes)

Episode citation and permanent link
Quintana, D.S., Heathers, J.A.J. (Hosts). (2020, March 2) “Now we’ll discover which meetings could’ve been emails”, Everything Hertz [Audio podcast], DOI: 10.17605/OSF.IO/DHGR6, Retrieved from https://osf.io/dhgr6/

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The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Dan Quintana, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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141: Getting Rid of “I Don’t Know” in Your Classroom


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Podcast: The Cult of Pedagogy Podcast
Episode: 141: Getting Rid of “I Don’t Know” in Your Classroom
Pub date: 2020-03-15

How often do you hear “I don’t know” in your classroom? For some students, this phrase becomes a crutch that stops them from learning. In this episode, I talk with author Connie Hamilton about how we can teach students to use more specific phrases that will keep them engaged instead of taking a pass.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Jennifer Gonzalez, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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97: Slow science


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Podcast: Everything Hertz
Episode: 97: Slow science
Pub date: 2019-12-02

Dan and James discuss the concept of “slow science”, which has been proposed in order to improve the quality of scientific research and create a more sustainable work environment.

Here’s what they cover in this episode

  • Thank you patrons day!
  • Social media algorithms reward outrage, not quality of substance
  • A paper on slow science from Uta Frith, which includes a proposal of publication limits
  • Is information overload really a problem?
  • The META platform for a weekly research digest
  • Would reducing the volume of publications really improve quality?
  • The working paper that simulated the quality vs. quantity question
  • The slow professor book https://utorontopress.com/ca/the-slow-professor-3
  • Michael Frank’s paper on N-best evaluation
  • Some institutions are now screening papers before submission to check for errors

Other links

Music credits: [Lee Rosevere](freemusicarchive.org/music/Lee_Rosevere/)


Support us on Patreon and get bonus stuff!

  • $1 a month or more: Monthly newsletter + Access to behind-the-scenes photos & video via the Patreon app + the the warm feeling you’re supporting the show
  • $5 a month or more: All the stuff you get in the one dollar tier PLUS a bonus mini episode every month (extras + the bits we couldn’t include in our regular episodes)

Episode citation and permanent link
Quintana, D.S., Heathers, J.A.J. (Hosts). (2019, December 2) “Slow Science”, Everything Hertz [Audio podcast], DOI: 10.17605/OSF.IO/XEU42, Retrieved from https://osf.io/xeu42/

Support Everything Hertz

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Episode 28: The Survival of Small Private Colleges


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Podcast: Future U Podcast
Episode: Episode 28: The Survival of Small Private Colleges
Pub date: 2019-02-05

Simmons University President Helen Drinan talked to Michael and Jeff about where small private colleges fit in the higher ed landscape and explained how her university bucked the trend of small schools that have failed.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Jeff Selingo and Michael Horn, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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