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Random Surfaces Hide an Intricate Order


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Podcast: Quanta Science Podcast
Episode: Random Surfaces Hide an Intricate Order
Pub date: 2020-06-18


Mathematicians have proved that a random process applied to a random surface will yield consistent patterns.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Quanta Magazine, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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135. The Science Training Toolbox with Dr. Andres De Los Reyes. Plus, Antiracism for Academia


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Podcast: Hello PhD
Episode: 135. The Science Training Toolbox with Dr. Andres De Los Reyes. Plus, Antiracism for Academia
Pub date: 2020-06-12

Have you ever lamented the fact that there isn’t some kind of instruction book to help you navigate your scientific training?

Wouldn’t it be nice if someone explained how to choose a mentor, or what it means to give a ‘job talk?’ And is there any advice for how to deal with that negative peer-reviewer, or how to escape a sub-par PI?

Well, you’re in luck, because The Early Career Researcher’s Toolbox: Insights into Mentors, Peer Review, and Landing a Faculty Job by Andres De Los Reyes, PhD, is exactly the guide you’ve been looking for.

And this week, we get this clinical psychologist’s insight into why academic training is so stressful, and how you can overcome the major hurdles along the way.

Emerging Academics

Andres De Los Reyes, PhD

Dr. De Los Reyes shares his definition of an Emerging Academic, a word he uses to describe that intense training period between undergrad and a faculty position. It’s a little bit like ’emerging adulthood’, he says, when we leave home to become real ‘grownups’, with all the uncertainty and responsibility that entails.

One reason academia makes that transition difficult is because our training programs are more focused on ‘book smarts’ than ‘street smarts,’ he says. We spend years learning the depth and nuance of our scientific field, but hardly anyone teaches us the actual skills that faculty use to succeed.

For example, you may get lucky enough to co-author a paper or two with your PI, but has anyone taught you how to successfully apply for grants?

Do you know how much budget to ask for when setting up a lab?

And what do you do if one of your competitors reviews your paper, and actively works against you with the editor?

The Early Career Researcher’s Toolbox answers those questions and more. It’s packed with step-by-step instructions, sample emails and cover letters, and personal stories from other Emerging Academics to help you realize you’re not alone on this journey.

It’s essential reading whether you’re an undergrad, a new faculty member, or anywhere in between.

Black Lives Matter

We also take some time in this episode to continue a conversation on many hearts and minds recently.

As the United States opens its eyes to the institutional racism that resulted in the murders of Breonna Taylor, George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery, and many before them, we must also reflect on and mobilize against the racism endemic in academia and research institutions.

That starts by listening to the voices of black and minority students who have faced implicit and explicit bias at every stage of life, including the Ivory Tower.

Then, we must do some work to understand your own implicit biases,

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Joshua Hall and Daniel Arneman, PhDz, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Culturally-Responsive Online Teaching


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Podcast: Teaching in Higher Ed
Episode: Culturally-Responsive Online Teaching
Pub date: 2020-06-18

EPISODE SPONSORS:

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Courtney Plotts discusses culturally-responsive online teaching on episode 314 of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast.

Quotes from the episode

If I really want to connect with you, I need to learn more about you and really define the space for you.

How well are we really reaching our students? How is that authenticity coming through?
-Courtney Plotts

Show me community and I will participate. Show me that I am safe. Show me you understand my concerns.
-Courtney Plotts

If I really want to connect with you, I need to learn more about you and really define the space for you.
-Courtney Plotts

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Skeptic Check: Data Bias (rebroadcast)


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Podcast: Big Picture Science
Episode: Skeptic Check: Data Bias (rebroadcast)
Pub date: 2020-06-15

Sexist snow plowing? Data that guide everything from snow removal schedules to heart research often fail to consider gender. In these cases, “reference man” stands in for “average human.”  Human bias also infects artificial intelligence, with speech recognition triggered only by male voices and facial recognition that can’t see black faces. We question the assumptions baked into these numbers and algorithms.

Guests:

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Seth Shostak, Molly Bentley, SETI Institute, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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[From the Archives] Ep 72: Dr. John Fritz on Researching Course Design and Analytics


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Podcast: Research in Action | A podcast for faculty & higher education professionals on research design, methods, productivity & more
Episode: [From the Archives] Ep 72: Dr. John Fritz on Researching Course Design and Analytics
Pub date: 2020-05-11

On this episode, Katie is joined by Dr. John Fritz, an Associate Vice President for Instructional Technology at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC). Working within UMBC’s Division of Information Technology, John is responsible for UMBC’s focused efforts in teaching, learning and technology, including learning analytics. He is also responsible for tier 1 (basic) user support including knowledge management. Previously, John served as UMBC’s Director of News & Online Information, and has more than 10 years’ experience as a public information officer, writer and editor in three University of Maryland campuses. John holds a Ph.D in Language, Literacy and Culture from UMBC, a Master’s degree in English (with an emphasis in rhetoric and composition) from the University of Maryland, College Park, a bachelor’s degree in English and religion from Columbia Union College in Takoma Park, Maryland, and certificates in New Media Publishing from the University of Baltimore and Instructional Systems Design from UMBC.

Segment 1: Faculty Course Design and Analytics [00:00-11:59]

In this first segment, John shares about some of his research on Learning Management Systems (LMSs)

In this segment, the following resources are mentioned:

Segment 2: Adaptive and Personalized Learning [12:00-21:44]

In segment two, John discusses the rise in adaptive and personalized learning platforms and what this means for research on student learning

In this segment, the following resources are mentioned:

Segment 3: The Art and Science of Nudge Analytics [21:45-34:05]

In segment three, John shares about a new interest area for him: nudge analytics.

In this segment, the following resources are mentioned:

To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, post a comment below or contact the “Research in Action” podcast:

Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111

If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review.

The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Ecampus or Oregon State University.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Dr. Katie Linder, Director of the Oregon State University Ecampus Research Unit, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Who’s Down with OPG?


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Podcast: The Black Goat
Episode: Who’s Down with OPG?
Pub date: 2019-05-29

Most doctoral training in psychology follows an apprentice model: Grad students affiliate with a primary advisor and lab, and do most of their training under that one person. But what happens when grad students and professors develop professional relationships outside of that traditional model? In this episode we discuss the politics and etiquette of students and faculty interacting and working together outside of the advisor-advisee model. How much control do – and should – advisors have over their advisees? How should faculty go about supporting and criticizing the work of students from other labs? What are the issues involved when faculty intervene (or don’t) in other advisor-advisee relationships? Plus: We answer a letter from an early-career researcher wondering if they should withdraw from a paper that is less rigorous and less open than they would like it to be.

The Black Goat is hosted by Sanjay Srivastava, Alexa Tullett, and Simine Vazire. Find us on the web at www.theblackgoatpodcast.com, on Twitter at @blackgoatpod, on Facebook at facebook.com/blackgoatpod/, and on instagram at @blackgoatpod. You can email us at letters@theblackgoatpodcast.com. You can subscribe to us on iTunes or Stitcher.

Our theme music is Peak Beak by Doctor Turtle, available on freemusicarchive.org under a Creative Commons noncommercial attribution license. Our logo was created by Jude Weaver.

This is episode 59. It was recorded on May 17, 2019.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Sanjay Srivastava, Alexa Tullett, and Simine Vazire, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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On the Scene: Stories about showing up when disaster strikes


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Podcast: The Story Collider
Episode: On the Scene: Stories about showing up when disaster strikes
Pub date: 2019-09-27

This week we present two stories about being the one who is there when it happens.

Part 1: Journalist Sarah Kaplan normally covers the science beat, but when tragedy strikes in Las Vegas, she takes on an assignment unlike any she’s had before.

Part 2: While covering the devastating impact of an earthquake in Thailand, journalist Maryn McKenna reflects on tragedy in her own life.

Sarah Kaplan is a reporter at the Washington Post covering news from around the nation and across the universe.

Maryn McKenna is an independent journalist who writes about public health, global health and food policy. She is a columnist for WIRED’s Ideas section and a Senior Fellow of the Center for the Study of Human Health at Emory University. She is the author of the 2017 bestseller BIG CHICKEN (tiled PLUCKED outside North America), SUPERBUG, and BEATING BACK THE DEVIL; her TED talk, “What do we do when antibiotics don’t work any more?”, is closing in on 1.8 million views. She lives in Atlanta.

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Erin Barker & Liz Neeley, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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Camb.ai: Event Special


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Podcast: Science Disrupt
Episode: Camb.ai: Event Special
Pub date: 2019-12-15

Back in October World AI Week saw the wonderful folks at Camb.ai run their event Blurred Lines: The Impact of AI in Business and Academia.

The panel set out to discuss challenging ideas in AI ethics, responsibility, and the incentives of business and science.

Our very own Gemma moderated the panel consisting of:

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Science Disrupt, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

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