Audio

Trauma-Informed Teaching and Learning

Podcast: Teaching in Higher Ed (LS 52 · TOP 0.5% what is this?)
Episode: Trauma-Informed Teaching and Learning
Pub date: 2020-11-12

Mays Imad discusses trauma-informed teaching and learning on episode 335 of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast.

Quotes from the episode

My goal is to engage students and help them feel empowered and liberated.

I am able to recognize when they are triggered and when they feel disengaged. I also am able to recognize it in myself. We can’t give what we don’t have.
-Mays Imad

I want to acknowledge that we can heal from trauma.
-Mays Imad

My goal is to engage students and help them feel empowered and liberated.
-Mays Imad

We are not just thinking machines; we are feeling machines capable of thinking.
-Mays Imad

Audio

It’s time to fix the “one size fits all” PhD

Podcast: Working Scientist (LS 30 · TOP 10% what is this?)
Episode: It’s time to fix the “one size fits all” PhD
Pub date: 2019-11-21

Julie Gould asks six higher education experts if it’s now time to go back to the drawing board and redesign graduate programmes from scratch.

Suzanne Ortega, president of the US Council of Graduate Schools, says programmes now include elements to accommodate some of the skills now being demanded by employers, including project and data management expertise. “We can’t expect to prepare doctoral researchers in a timely fashion by simply adding more and more separate activities,” she tells Gould. “We need to redesign the curricula and the capstone project,” referring to the PhD as a long-term investigative project that culminates in a final product.

Jonathan Jansen, professor of education at Stellenbosch University, South Africa, calls for more flexible and modular programmes and describes as an example how MBA programmes have evolved from a full-time one year course to include part-time online only programmes and a “blended” combination of the two approaches. “It’s about trying to figure out in terms of your own lifestyle what kind of progarmme design works for you,” he says. “One size does not fit all.”

But Jansen’s colleague Liezel Frick, director of the university’s centre for higher and adult education, says it’s important to remember the ultimate goal of a PhD. She tells Gould: “I get the point around flexibility but it’s still a research focused degree. You still have to make an original contribution to your field of knowledge. Otherwise it becomes a continuing professional development programme where you can do odds and ends but never get to the core of it, which is a substantive research contribution.”

David Bogle, a doctoral school pro-vice-provost at UCL, London, says it’s important to remember that graduate students are part of a cohort and community who should be respected and rewarded, not looked down on and treated as second class citizens. “At the moment there’s a certain amount of ‘I’m the supervisor. You should be looking to me as the primary source of inspiration,’ when in fact the inspiration comes from peers, professional communities, training and cross disciplinary activities.”

This is the second episode in a five-part series timed to coincide with Nature’s 2019 PhD survey. Many of the 6,300 graduate students who responded call for more one-to-one support and better career guidance from PhD supervisors.

 


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Audio

The New History of the Milky Way

Podcast: Quanta Science Podcast (LS 48 · TOP 1% what is this?)
Episode: The New History of the Milky Way
Pub date: 2021-03-04

Over the past two years, astronomers have rewritten the story of our galaxy.

The post The New History of the Milky Way first appeared on Quanta Magazine.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Quanta Magazine, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

Audio

Our Material World w/ Ainissa Ramirez

Podcast: Talk Nerdy with Cara Santa Maria (LS 60 · TOP 0.5% what is this?)
Episode: Our Material World w/ Ainissa Ramirez
Pub date: 2021-02-22


In this episode of Talk Nerdy, Cara is joined by materials scientist, author, and science communicator Dr. Ainissa Ramirez. They talk about her new book (and winner of the 2021 AAAS/Subaru Prize for Excellence in Science Books), The Alchemy of Us: How Humans and Matter Transformed One Another. From clocks to light bulbs to silicon chips, they dig into the myriad ways such groundbreaking inventions have profoundly changed the way we exist in the world, with a special emphasis on the under-appreciated figures who paved the way.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Cara Santa Maria, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

Audio

128: How do you generate new research ideas?

Podcast: Everything Hertz (LS 42 · TOP 2% what is this?)
Episode: 128: How do you generate new research ideas?
Pub date: 2021-03-15

Dan and James chat about how they come up with new ideas, why everyone seems to be trying to monetise their hobbies, and why it’s so hard for most labs to have a singular focus of research.

We had some problems with James’ mic so the quality of his audio wasn’t up our usual standard. To make up for this we’ve added one of our older bonus episodes at the end of this conventional episode (this begins at 54:18). These bonus episodes are typically only made available for our Professor Fancypants Patreon patrons, but now you’ll get to hear one!

Other notes and links:

  • The half-serious “Highlander” bounty program from Noah Haber
  • The metapsy journal
  • How do we come up with new ideas?
  • What James watches and listens to in his spare time
  • The urge to monetise your hobby
  • The “Let’s do nothing” kids book
  • How to Do Nothing” by Jenny Odell
  • Robert Provine’s Laughter as a scientific problem: An adventure in sidewalk neuroscience
  • The value of including many experiments in a single paper
  • Is there too much reform happening in psychology?
  • Clubhouse and the new twitter clone, ‘Spaces’ (still in beta)
  • Bonus episode 15: The true truth of pre-registration

Other links

Music credits: [Lee Rosevere](freemusicarchive.org/music/Lee_Rosevere/)


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Episode citation

Quintana, D.S., Heathers, J.A.J. (Hosts). (2021, March 15) “128: How do you generate new research ideas?”, Everything Hertz [Audio podcast], DOI: 10.17605/OSF.IO/U79NW

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The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Dan Quintana, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

Audio

Two Sides Mini-Series, Part 1: Two Apartments

Podcast: The Story Collider (LS 58 · TOP 0.5% what is this?)
Episode: Two Sides Mini-Series, Part 1: Two Apartments
Pub date: 2021-03-12

This week is the start of a very special three-part mini-series centered around stories about mental health, told from two different perspectives. This mini-series is guest hosted and produced by Story Collider senior producer Misha Gajewski.

The first episode of this series features a story told by a couple, chemist Xavier Jordan Retana and editor Brittany Lundberg. After moving into separate apartments during the pandemic, Xavier and Brittany each find themselves navigating their mental health and coping with a new sense of independence.

As always, find photos and transcripts for all of our stories at storycollider.org

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Erin Barker, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

Audio

Undisciplined: Combatting Vaccine Misinformation

Podcast: UnDisciplined
Episode: Undisciplined: Combatting Vaccine Misinformation
Pub date: 2021-03-12


Even before the COVID-19 pandemic there was a lot of misinformation about vaccines floating around on social media. Public health agencies have been trying to figure out what to do. It turns out that one of the most powerful remedies is also one of the simplest.

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Utah Public Radio, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.

Audio

Stories of COVID-19: Love, Part 1

Podcast: The Story Collider (LS 58 · TOP 0.5% what is this?)
Episode: Stories of COVID-19: Love, Part 1
Pub date: 2021-01-29

Throughout the tragic events of the past few months — and despite the tragic events still to come — love still perseveres and flourishes. From an unlikely pandemic wedding to the bond formed between researcher and patient, this episode will examine the powerful love that sustains us during this time.

Our first story is from Melanie Hamlett, a Moth-slam-winning storyteller and writer currently based in France. After a life of proud singlehood, Melanie considers settling down during the pandemic. (Just a warning — this story is a bit “R-rated”!) As always, find photos and transcripts of all of our stories on our website.

After Melanie’s story, our host speaks with Joanne Davila, professor of psychology at Stony Brook University, about how the pandemic is affecting relationships.

Stay tuned for Part 2 of this episode on Monday!

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The podcast and artwork embedded on this page are from Erin Barker, which is the property of its owner and not affiliated with or endorsed by Listen Notes, Inc.